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Starbucks Will Open Reserve Roastery in Italy Next Year

Starbucks Will Open Reserve Roastery in Italy Next Year


The 25,000-square-foot retail space will carry small-batch Reserve coffees

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Percassi, Starbucks’ Italian licensee and business partner, will open more locations throughout 2018 after the Roastery opening.

This week, Starbucks not only debuted its new spring drinks, but it also announced that it will enter the Italian coffee market with a new Reserve Roastery location on Piazza Cordusio in Milan.

This location will be the first Starbucks Roastery location to open in the Europe, Middle East, and Africa region, and the fifth in the world, according to the company.

“It took us some time to find it, but once I walked through the former Post Office building, I knew that it would be the perfect location to honor the craft of coffee and pay respect to the uniquely Italian culture in which it will be served," Howard Schultz, Starbucks chairman and CEO, said in a statement.

"This store will be the culmination of a great dream of mine — 34 years in the making — to return to Milan with one of the most immersive, magical retail experiences in the world.”

The company’s expansion has even received a nod of approval from Milan Mayor Giuseppe Sala.

“Starbucks is a brand famous worldwide,” he said. “Its presence in the city is for us a further confirmation of the important attractiveness of Milan on the entrepreneurial scale.”


Benvenuto! Starbucks Plans To Open In A Country Where Coffee Is Life

The coffee chain said Wednesday it'll open what it calls a "coffee shrine" in Milan next year.

Starbucks opening a roastery in Italy is a big deal.

For one, it'll be the first of the company's high-end locations in Europe.

Secondly, Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz initially drew inspiration for his coffee-shop chain after visiting Italy in the ྌs.

"Strategically, it's not the biggest market in the world, but it's the most important market for me personally and for the company," Schultz told Bloomberg. "Why? Because the Italians mastered coffee way before Starbucks."

Italians have their own coffee culture, and their language for it is definitely different from Americans'.

For example, an Italian barista might give you a funny look if you try to order an espresso because over there, it's just a technical term and not an actual drink.

And if you ask for a latte, prepare to be handed a glass of milk — because that's what you ordered.

Instead, you'll need to order a caffè latte if you want the U.S. version, a straight latte.

So Starbucks might need to retool its menu to fit in with Italian coffee-lovers. And it might not need to stock those iconic portable cups. Many Italians might drink coffee up to eight times a day, but they rarely do so while on the go.

After opening its Milan Reserve Roastery in 2018, Starbucks's Italian licensee and business partner Percassi will open a number of regular Starbucks locations in the Italian city. A Starbucks press release says "each new store will be carefully designed and curated to respect the local community and unique Milanese context."


Benvenuto! Starbucks Plans To Open In A Country Where Coffee Is Life

The coffee chain said Wednesday it'll open what it calls a "coffee shrine" in Milan next year.

Starbucks opening a roastery in Italy is a big deal.

For one, it'll be the first of the company's high-end locations in Europe.

Secondly, Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz initially drew inspiration for his coffee-shop chain after visiting Italy in the ྌs.

"Strategically, it's not the biggest market in the world, but it's the most important market for me personally and for the company," Schultz told Bloomberg. "Why? Because the Italians mastered coffee way before Starbucks."

Italians have their own coffee culture, and their language for it is definitely different from Americans'.

For example, an Italian barista might give you a funny look if you try to order an espresso because over there, it's just a technical term and not an actual drink.

And if you ask for a latte, prepare to be handed a glass of milk — because that's what you ordered.

Instead, you'll need to order a caffè latte if you want the U.S. version, a straight latte.

So Starbucks might need to retool its menu to fit in with Italian coffee-lovers. And it might not need to stock those iconic portable cups. Many Italians might drink coffee up to eight times a day, but they rarely do so while on the go.

After opening its Milan Reserve Roastery in 2018, Starbucks's Italian licensee and business partner Percassi will open a number of regular Starbucks locations in the Italian city. A Starbucks press release says "each new store will be carefully designed and curated to respect the local community and unique Milanese context."


Benvenuto! Starbucks Plans To Open In A Country Where Coffee Is Life

The coffee chain said Wednesday it'll open what it calls a "coffee shrine" in Milan next year.

Starbucks opening a roastery in Italy is a big deal.

For one, it'll be the first of the company's high-end locations in Europe.

Secondly, Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz initially drew inspiration for his coffee-shop chain after visiting Italy in the ྌs.

"Strategically, it's not the biggest market in the world, but it's the most important market for me personally and for the company," Schultz told Bloomberg. "Why? Because the Italians mastered coffee way before Starbucks."

Italians have their own coffee culture, and their language for it is definitely different from Americans'.

For example, an Italian barista might give you a funny look if you try to order an espresso because over there, it's just a technical term and not an actual drink.

And if you ask for a latte, prepare to be handed a glass of milk — because that's what you ordered.

Instead, you'll need to order a caffè latte if you want the U.S. version, a straight latte.

So Starbucks might need to retool its menu to fit in with Italian coffee-lovers. And it might not need to stock those iconic portable cups. Many Italians might drink coffee up to eight times a day, but they rarely do so while on the go.

After opening its Milan Reserve Roastery in 2018, Starbucks's Italian licensee and business partner Percassi will open a number of regular Starbucks locations in the Italian city. A Starbucks press release says "each new store will be carefully designed and curated to respect the local community and unique Milanese context."


Benvenuto! Starbucks Plans To Open In A Country Where Coffee Is Life

The coffee chain said Wednesday it'll open what it calls a "coffee shrine" in Milan next year.

Starbucks opening a roastery in Italy is a big deal.

For one, it'll be the first of the company's high-end locations in Europe.

Secondly, Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz initially drew inspiration for his coffee-shop chain after visiting Italy in the ྌs.

"Strategically, it's not the biggest market in the world, but it's the most important market for me personally and for the company," Schultz told Bloomberg. "Why? Because the Italians mastered coffee way before Starbucks."

Italians have their own coffee culture, and their language for it is definitely different from Americans'.

For example, an Italian barista might give you a funny look if you try to order an espresso because over there, it's just a technical term and not an actual drink.

And if you ask for a latte, prepare to be handed a glass of milk — because that's what you ordered.

Instead, you'll need to order a caffè latte if you want the U.S. version, a straight latte.

So Starbucks might need to retool its menu to fit in with Italian coffee-lovers. And it might not need to stock those iconic portable cups. Many Italians might drink coffee up to eight times a day, but they rarely do so while on the go.

After opening its Milan Reserve Roastery in 2018, Starbucks's Italian licensee and business partner Percassi will open a number of regular Starbucks locations in the Italian city. A Starbucks press release says "each new store will be carefully designed and curated to respect the local community and unique Milanese context."


Benvenuto! Starbucks Plans To Open In A Country Where Coffee Is Life

The coffee chain said Wednesday it'll open what it calls a "coffee shrine" in Milan next year.

Starbucks opening a roastery in Italy is a big deal.

For one, it'll be the first of the company's high-end locations in Europe.

Secondly, Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz initially drew inspiration for his coffee-shop chain after visiting Italy in the ྌs.

"Strategically, it's not the biggest market in the world, but it's the most important market for me personally and for the company," Schultz told Bloomberg. "Why? Because the Italians mastered coffee way before Starbucks."

Italians have their own coffee culture, and their language for it is definitely different from Americans'.

For example, an Italian barista might give you a funny look if you try to order an espresso because over there, it's just a technical term and not an actual drink.

And if you ask for a latte, prepare to be handed a glass of milk — because that's what you ordered.

Instead, you'll need to order a caffè latte if you want the U.S. version, a straight latte.

So Starbucks might need to retool its menu to fit in with Italian coffee-lovers. And it might not need to stock those iconic portable cups. Many Italians might drink coffee up to eight times a day, but they rarely do so while on the go.

After opening its Milan Reserve Roastery in 2018, Starbucks's Italian licensee and business partner Percassi will open a number of regular Starbucks locations in the Italian city. A Starbucks press release says "each new store will be carefully designed and curated to respect the local community and unique Milanese context."


Benvenuto! Starbucks Plans To Open In A Country Where Coffee Is Life

The coffee chain said Wednesday it'll open what it calls a "coffee shrine" in Milan next year.

Starbucks opening a roastery in Italy is a big deal.

For one, it'll be the first of the company's high-end locations in Europe.

Secondly, Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz initially drew inspiration for his coffee-shop chain after visiting Italy in the ྌs.

"Strategically, it's not the biggest market in the world, but it's the most important market for me personally and for the company," Schultz told Bloomberg. "Why? Because the Italians mastered coffee way before Starbucks."

Italians have their own coffee culture, and their language for it is definitely different from Americans'.

For example, an Italian barista might give you a funny look if you try to order an espresso because over there, it's just a technical term and not an actual drink.

And if you ask for a latte, prepare to be handed a glass of milk — because that's what you ordered.

Instead, you'll need to order a caffè latte if you want the U.S. version, a straight latte.

So Starbucks might need to retool its menu to fit in with Italian coffee-lovers. And it might not need to stock those iconic portable cups. Many Italians might drink coffee up to eight times a day, but they rarely do so while on the go.

After opening its Milan Reserve Roastery in 2018, Starbucks's Italian licensee and business partner Percassi will open a number of regular Starbucks locations in the Italian city. A Starbucks press release says "each new store will be carefully designed and curated to respect the local community and unique Milanese context."


Benvenuto! Starbucks Plans To Open In A Country Where Coffee Is Life

The coffee chain said Wednesday it'll open what it calls a "coffee shrine" in Milan next year.

Starbucks opening a roastery in Italy is a big deal.

For one, it'll be the first of the company's high-end locations in Europe.

Secondly, Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz initially drew inspiration for his coffee-shop chain after visiting Italy in the ྌs.

"Strategically, it's not the biggest market in the world, but it's the most important market for me personally and for the company," Schultz told Bloomberg. "Why? Because the Italians mastered coffee way before Starbucks."

Italians have their own coffee culture, and their language for it is definitely different from Americans'.

For example, an Italian barista might give you a funny look if you try to order an espresso because over there, it's just a technical term and not an actual drink.

And if you ask for a latte, prepare to be handed a glass of milk — because that's what you ordered.

Instead, you'll need to order a caffè latte if you want the U.S. version, a straight latte.

So Starbucks might need to retool its menu to fit in with Italian coffee-lovers. And it might not need to stock those iconic portable cups. Many Italians might drink coffee up to eight times a day, but they rarely do so while on the go.

After opening its Milan Reserve Roastery in 2018, Starbucks's Italian licensee and business partner Percassi will open a number of regular Starbucks locations in the Italian city. A Starbucks press release says "each new store will be carefully designed and curated to respect the local community and unique Milanese context."


Benvenuto! Starbucks Plans To Open In A Country Where Coffee Is Life

The coffee chain said Wednesday it'll open what it calls a "coffee shrine" in Milan next year.

Starbucks opening a roastery in Italy is a big deal.

For one, it'll be the first of the company's high-end locations in Europe.

Secondly, Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz initially drew inspiration for his coffee-shop chain after visiting Italy in the ྌs.

"Strategically, it's not the biggest market in the world, but it's the most important market for me personally and for the company," Schultz told Bloomberg. "Why? Because the Italians mastered coffee way before Starbucks."

Italians have their own coffee culture, and their language for it is definitely different from Americans'.

For example, an Italian barista might give you a funny look if you try to order an espresso because over there, it's just a technical term and not an actual drink.

And if you ask for a latte, prepare to be handed a glass of milk — because that's what you ordered.

Instead, you'll need to order a caffè latte if you want the U.S. version, a straight latte.

So Starbucks might need to retool its menu to fit in with Italian coffee-lovers. And it might not need to stock those iconic portable cups. Many Italians might drink coffee up to eight times a day, but they rarely do so while on the go.

After opening its Milan Reserve Roastery in 2018, Starbucks's Italian licensee and business partner Percassi will open a number of regular Starbucks locations in the Italian city. A Starbucks press release says "each new store will be carefully designed and curated to respect the local community and unique Milanese context."


Benvenuto! Starbucks Plans To Open In A Country Where Coffee Is Life

The coffee chain said Wednesday it'll open what it calls a "coffee shrine" in Milan next year.

Starbucks opening a roastery in Italy is a big deal.

For one, it'll be the first of the company's high-end locations in Europe.

Secondly, Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz initially drew inspiration for his coffee-shop chain after visiting Italy in the ྌs.

"Strategically, it's not the biggest market in the world, but it's the most important market for me personally and for the company," Schultz told Bloomberg. "Why? Because the Italians mastered coffee way before Starbucks."

Italians have their own coffee culture, and their language for it is definitely different from Americans'.

For example, an Italian barista might give you a funny look if you try to order an espresso because over there, it's just a technical term and not an actual drink.

And if you ask for a latte, prepare to be handed a glass of milk — because that's what you ordered.

Instead, you'll need to order a caffè latte if you want the U.S. version, a straight latte.

So Starbucks might need to retool its menu to fit in with Italian coffee-lovers. And it might not need to stock those iconic portable cups. Many Italians might drink coffee up to eight times a day, but they rarely do so while on the go.

After opening its Milan Reserve Roastery in 2018, Starbucks's Italian licensee and business partner Percassi will open a number of regular Starbucks locations in the Italian city. A Starbucks press release says "each new store will be carefully designed and curated to respect the local community and unique Milanese context."


Benvenuto! Starbucks Plans To Open In A Country Where Coffee Is Life

The coffee chain said Wednesday it'll open what it calls a "coffee shrine" in Milan next year.

Starbucks opening a roastery in Italy is a big deal.

For one, it'll be the first of the company's high-end locations in Europe.

Secondly, Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz initially drew inspiration for his coffee-shop chain after visiting Italy in the ྌs.

"Strategically, it's not the biggest market in the world, but it's the most important market for me personally and for the company," Schultz told Bloomberg. "Why? Because the Italians mastered coffee way before Starbucks."

Italians have their own coffee culture, and their language for it is definitely different from Americans'.

For example, an Italian barista might give you a funny look if you try to order an espresso because over there, it's just a technical term and not an actual drink.

And if you ask for a latte, prepare to be handed a glass of milk — because that's what you ordered.

Instead, you'll need to order a caffè latte if you want the U.S. version, a straight latte.

So Starbucks might need to retool its menu to fit in with Italian coffee-lovers. And it might not need to stock those iconic portable cups. Many Italians might drink coffee up to eight times a day, but they rarely do so while on the go.

After opening its Milan Reserve Roastery in 2018, Starbucks's Italian licensee and business partner Percassi will open a number of regular Starbucks locations in the Italian city. A Starbucks press release says "each new store will be carefully designed and curated to respect the local community and unique Milanese context."