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Seven minute frosting recipe

Seven minute frosting recipe


  • Recipes
  • Dish type
  • Cake
  • Cake decorating
  • Icing

This is an American recipe for fluffy white icing to use on cupcakes.

116 people made this

IngredientsServes: 48

  • 2 egg whites
  • 1 pinch salt
  • 300g (11 oz) caster sugar
  • 5 tablespoons water
  • 1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

MethodPrep:3min ›Cook:7min ›Ready in:10min

  1. In the top of a double boiler, combine all ingredients but the vanilla. Beat 1 minute. Cook over boiling water beating constantly for 7 minutes or until the icing makes firm peaks.
  2. Remove from the heat and add the vanilla. Beat until able to spread.

Note:

You can add colouring to the frosting if desired, and can also use almond, rum or lemon extract instead of the vanilla for flavouring.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(90)

Reviews in English (72)

by Lisa

Used different ingredients.I use this recipe, but I add 4 marshmallows when I pull it off the heat, and beat until they melt and it's ready to spread. I've also used orange juice in place of water and orange extract in place of vanilla. It's great with my orange cream cake. It's a wonderful marshmallow frosting!-21 Jul 2008

I love the look of this recipe and I really want to make it... but since it is made from egg white would it not harden over time? Thanks if you could tell me if it would-22 Nov 2012

by HAGANRD

I love this icing! I've used it for years, and it never fails to be a favourite among kids and adults, as well as a wonderful decoration on any cake or cupcake.-21 Jul 2008


7 Minute Frosting Recipe

This meringue-like frosting will practically melt in your mouth and it takes less than 10 minutes to make. Vanilla 14 cup Karo Syrup-Corn Syrup 18 tsp.

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In the top of a double boiler combine the sugar water egg whites corn syrup cream of tartar and the pinch of salt.

7 minute frosting recipe. Michelle March 31 2018 944 pm Reply. Beat constantly with electric beater while it cooks for 7 minutes or until it will stand in peaks when beater is raised. Supplies for 7 Minute Frosting.

Remove from heat and stir in vanilla. How do you make 7 minute frosting. Im making a bunny cake and it calls for 55 cups of icing.

Beat until mixed well. 2 12 cups sugar 3 egg whites 12 cup water 1 tsp. Fills and frosts 2 layer cake 8 or 9 inch.

This frosting is great for making spikes peaks or for getting a cake that looks homemade because the icing can get very stiff and will hold a peak or a knife swirl. Im looking forward to making your 7 minute icing recipe. Youll need these ingredients plus a pinch of salt.

7 Minute Frosting is light and fluffy and has the perfect bright white color. Begin by placing the water in a small sauce pan. Its called 7-minute frosting because thats how long you need to cookwhip it.

Hi Bea It yields 25 cups check the yield box in the recipe. This frosting is made over the stovetop so youll need either a double boiler or a heat safe glass bowl that can sit on top of a saucepan. Add the sugar but dont stir it.

Beat with an electric mixer at low speed for 30 seconds then set the pan over but not. Put egg whites sugar water and syrup in top of double boiler. Place over rapidly boiling water.

Seven Minute Frosting Recipe. Place over medium low heat and beat with an electric hand mixer constantly for 5-7 minutes or until icing is fluffy and stiff peaks form when beaters are removed. Youll boil water in the bottom pan and whip the frosting.

Im curious if I have to double it for my purposes. You cook the egg whites and sugar and whip them up. How much will your recipe make.

We love recipes that honor how grandma used to make them and 7 minute frosting is one such recipe. Place the sauce pan with the water and sugar on Medium-High heat on your stove top. I just swirled it around a time or two as I moved it over to the stove.

Seven-minute frosting or boiled frosting is basically a Swiss meringue.

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What is 7 Minute Frosting?

Seven-minute frosting (or boiled frosting) is basically a Swiss meringue. You cook the egg whites and sugar and whip them up. It’s called 7-minute frosting because that’s how long you need to cook/whip it.

The traditional recipe calls for whipping the meringue over a double boiler with a hand mixer. This is too “hands-on” for my liking, so I’m making it the way I make the meringue for my Swiss Meringue Buttercream.

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Egg whites: I use cold, from the fridge egg whites. It’s really important that you don’t get any yolk in the egg white when separating, though, because the frosting won’t whip up right with yolk in it.

Corn syrup: Unfortunately, I don’t have a good substitute for the corn syrup in the recipe.

Double boiler: If you don’t have a double boiler, check out my section just below for tips on faking a double boiler.

Salt: A couple pinches of salt help to add balance to the frosting.

Cream of tartar: The cream of tartar helps to stabilize the frosting.

How to fake a double boiler

There are a couple of ways to make a makeshift double boiler.

You can stack two pots together. The lower pot will hold the boiling water, and the upper pot will hold the frosting ingredients.

If you stack the pots, it’s important that you don’t use a pot with a nonstick coating that will come off while you’re mixing the frosting.

You can also use a heat-safe metal or glass bowl placed over a pot of boiling water (pictured in the step-by-step how-to section above). I think this method is a little easier because it gives you more room to mix the frosting while it cooks.

>>Top tip: It’s important that you don’t let the bottom of the bowl or pot touch the boiling water.


How to make old-fashioned 7-minute frosting, plus a dozen variations to try

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But just because it&rsquos affordable and old-fashioned doesn&rsquot mean it won&rsquot be delicious to today&rsquos taste buds! The recipe lasted so long in the first place because people loved it. (If you haven&rsquot heard of it, it may be because it was edged out by ready-made frosting-in-a-can, which became popular in the mid-sixties.)

Because of its meringue-type consistency, it&rsquos not a long-lasting frosting &mdash more robust than a whipped cream frosting, but not as sturdy as a buttercream &mdash so frost your cooled cake shortly before serving.

A variation of this classic &mdash which uses brown sugar in place of the white &mdash is known as seafoam frosting. (That full recipe is below.)

Here, find out how to make the original 7-minute frosting &mdash plus get some how-tos on whipping up some tasty new ways to enjoy this icing! All of these recipes and suggested variations came from newspapers across the country, published from the 1940s through the early 1970s.

Recipe for the famous old-fashioned 7-minute frosting

There&rsquos nothing like a homemade frosting to complement the flavor of your homemade cake! This fluffy, versatile seven-minute frosting adds something special to almost any cake.

There are a few important things to remember when making this frosting. First, be sure to measure the ingredients accurately, especially the corn syrup. Also, before you start beating the frosting mixture over the heat, check that the water for the double boiler is at a full boil (and make sure none of the water gets in with the frosting).

Finally, a tip to know when it&rsquos done: the icing is cooked enough when it piles up in soft little peaks that hold their shape.

Seven-minute frosting: Base recipe

Ingredients

2 egg whites (room temperature)
1-1/2 cups sugar
Dash of salt
1/3 cup water
2 teaspoons light corn syrup
1 teaspoon vanilla

Before putting the mixture on the heat, combine the egg whites, sugar, salt, water, and corn syrup in top of a double boiler. Beat about 1 minute, or until thoroughly mixed.

Next, place the top of the double boiler over boiling water, and beat constantly with a rotary beater (or at high speed of electric mixer) for 7 minutes, or until frosting will stand in stiff peaks, stirring frosting up from bottom and sides of pan occasionally with a rubber scraper, spatula or spoon.

Remove from boiling water. For a very smooth and satiny frosting, pour at once into a large bowl for a final beating. Finally, add vanilla and beat 1 minute, or until thick it is enough to spread.

Note: The mixture may be tinted by gently stirring in one or more drops of food coloring.

To use on cakes

This recipe makes 4-1/2 cups of frosting, or enough to cover tops and sides of two 8-inch layers (generously) or two 9-inch layers or top and sides of 9- or 10-inch square cake or 13×9-inch cake, or 10-inch tube cake, or about 16 large or 2 dozen small cupcakes Or makes enough filling for a 15×10-inch cake roll.

Mix 2 batches of this recipe to frost tops and sides of three 10-inch layers, or to frost three-tiered layer cake (8-, 10-, 12- inch deep layers), or a three-tiered oblong cake.

Now, try a dozen different variations!
1. Seafoam frosting

Follow classic recipe above, but use 1-1/2 cups firmly-packed brown sugar in place of the white sugar.

2. Chocolate seven-minute frosting

Melt 3 squares (3 ounces) semi-sweet chocolate and set aside to cool. Follow base recipe above, then blend in chocolate when mixture holds stiff peaks.

3. Lemon 7-minute frosting

Follow base recipe above, but substitute 1 tablespoon of lemon juice for the vanilla extract, and add 1 teaspoon grated lemon peel during the last minute of beating.

4. Orange seven-minute frosting

Follow base recipe above, except reduce water to 1/4 cup and add 5 tablespoons orange juice. Omit the vanilla, and add 1/8 to 1/4 teaspoon almond extract. Add 1 teaspoon grated orange peel during the last minute of beating.

5. Coconut-marshmallow seven-minute frosting

Follow base recipe above, then fold in 1 cup marshmallows, quartered, before spreading on cake. Then sprinkle top and sides of cake with 1-1/3 cups flaked coconut while frosting is still soft. (You might also like this recipe: The retro &lsquoRave Reviews&rsquo coconut cake with coconut cream cheese frosting.)

6. Coffee 7-minute frosting

Follow base recipe above, but add 2 to 3 teaspoons instant coffee to the egg white mixture before beating.

7. Almond seven-minute frosting

Follow base recipe above, but decrease vanilla to 1/4 teaspoon and add 1/2 teaspoon almond extract.

8. Pineapple 7-minute frosting

Follow base recipe above, but substitute 1/2 cup canned pineapple juice for the water. Omit corn syrup and vanilla. Add 1/2 cup well-drained canned crushed pineapple.

9. Cherry 7-minute frosting

Follow base recipe above, but add 3 tablespoons maraschino cherry juice with the unbeaten egg white, and substitute 2 teaspoons grated lemon rind for the vanilla.

10. Pistachio 7-minute frosting

Follow base recipe above, then substitute 1/2 to 1 teaspoon pistachio extract for vanilla extract. Blend in 1 or 2 drops green food coloring, if desired.

11. Peppermint seven-minute frosting

Follow base recipe above, then fold in 1/2 cup finely-crushed peppermint candy and 2 drops red food coloring.

12. Burgundy wine 7-minute frosting

Follow base recipe above, but substitute 1/3 to 1/2 cup Burgundy for the water. Omit vanilla. Tint frosting with red food coloring.

MORE FROSTING DELICIOUSNESS

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Seven Minute Frosting

If you’re looking for a glaze that is universally loved and has really stood the test of time, look no further than the seven-minute glaze. Since the early 1900s, there’s nothing you can do with this light, fluffy swamp icing. In terms of texture and taste, there is no other icing like it. And like a glaze that cooks on the stovetop, the preparation is a little different than most. (But don’t let that fool you into thinking it’s difficult. Your grandmother could handle it and so can you).

The seven-minute frosting cooks in a double boiler on the stove, although if you don’t have a double boiler, a heatproof bowl placed over a pot of boiling water works just fine. Combine all the ingredients-sugar, water, egg whites, cream of tartar and salt in a bowl and beat with an electric mixer for just 30 seconds. Then you place the bowl over a pan of boiling water (but without touching the water or it will cook too fast) and continue beating for – you guessed it – seven minutes.

The mixture will become thick and shiny. Take it off the heat, add a little vanilla and continue beating for another minute or two. (So it actually takes a little longer than seven minutes, but that’s okay.) You can use light corn syrup instead of cream of tartar if you want, a spoonful should do it, and you can adjust the amount of vanilla to your liking.

This is a glaze you want to make and use it on the day you plan to serve the cake as it will start to decompose and sink into the cake if it stays on too long. You will also want to glaze your baked goods shortly after you finish making the glaze because it will settle and be difficult to spread quickly.

With its meringue or swamp texture, Seven-Minute Frosting is a spreadable product, but not a spreadable one. It gives a sweet, fluffy bite to any cake it covers and is something every baker should try at least once. (But we can promise that it’s good enough that you definitely won’t stop on the first try).

INGREDIENTS

1 1/2 cups of sugar
1/3 cup of cold water
2 large egg whites
1/2 teaspoon cream of tartar
A pinch of salt
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

PREPARATION

In a medium glass bowl, combine sugar, water, egg whites, cream of tartar and salt.
Place a pan of water on the stove to simmer. Meanwhile, beat the egg mixture with an electric mixer over low heat for 30 seconds. Place the bowl over the pan of water over low heat, forming a double boiler and continue to beat over high heat for 7 minutes, until it is hard and shiny.
Remove from heat, add vanilla and stir for 1 to 2 more minutes.
Use immediately, the glaze will set quickly.


Seven Minute Frosting

If you’re looking for a frosting that’s universally loved and has truly stood the test of time, look no further than Seven Minute Frosting. Dating back to the early 1900s, there’s just no match for this light and fluffy marshmallow-like stuff. In texture and taste, no other frosting out there is quite like it. And as a frosting that’s cooked on the stovetop, the preparation is a little different from most too. (But don’t let that fool you into thinking that it’s difficult. Your grandma could handle it and you can too.)

Seven Minute Frosting is cooked in a double boiler on the stove, though if you don’t have a double boiler, a heat-proof bowl placed over a pan of simmering water works just fine. You combine all your ingredients – sugar, water, egg whites, cream of tartar, and salt – in a bowl and beat it with an electric mixer for just thirty seconds. Then you place the bowl over a pan of simmering water (but not touching the water or it will cook too fast) and continue beating for – you guessed it – seven minutes.

The mixture will become thick and glossy. You remove it from the heat, add a little bit of vanilla, and continue beating for another minute or two. (So in actuality it takes a little longer than seven minutes, but that’s alright.) You can use light corn syrup in place of the cream of tartar if you wish, a tablespoon should do it, and you can adjust the amount of vanilla to your liking.

This is a frosting you want to make and use the day you plan to serve the cake as it will start to break down and sink into the cake if it sits for too long. You also want to frost your baked goods soon after you’ve finished making the frosting because it will set up and become hard to spread pretty quickly.

With its meringue or marshmallow-like texture, Seven Minute Frosting is one that’s fit for spreading, but not for piping. It lends a sweet and fluffy bite to any cake it tops, and it’s one that every baker should try at least once. (But we can promise that it’s good enough that you definitely won’t stop at that first try.)


For a Stand Mixer With a Bowl-Lift Design: Tear off a long strip of foil and crumple it into a thick ring. Place it in the bottom of a 3-quart saucier, or similarly large, wide pot, and fill with roughly 1 1/2 inches water. Place over high heat until bubbling-hot, then adjust the temperature to maintain a gentle simmer.

In a stainless steel stand mixer bowl, combine egg whites, toasted sugar, salt, and cream of tartar. Set over the steaming water so that the bowl is resting on the foil ring and touching neither the water nor the pot itself. Cook, stirring and scraping constantly with a flexible spatula, until egg whites register 175°F (79°C) on a digital thermometer this should take no longer than 10 to 12 minutes. Transfer bowl to a stand mixer fitted with a whisk attachment.

For a Stand Mixer With a Tilt-Head Design: Fill a large pot with a few inches of water. Place over high heat until bubbling-hot. In a large glass or ceramic bowl, combine egg whites, toasted sugar, salt, and cream of tartar. Set bowl over the steaming water, then cook, stirring and scraping constantly with a flexible spatula, until egg whites register 175°F (79°C) on a digital thermometer this should take no longer than 12 minutes. Scrape mixture into the stand mixer bowl and fit stand mixer with a whisk attachment.

Add the vanilla extract, and whip the meringue on high speed until glossy, stiff, and cool to the touch. Along the way, pause mixing to taste the meringue, adjusting the salt and vanilla as needed if using an extract of another flavor, fold it in with a flexible spatula at the very end, as the oil content of flavors like citrus, almond, or mint may otherwise deflate the meringue.

Use immediately as a frosting for cake, and serve as soon as possible at cool room temperature, the frosting will hold for about 24 hours, as the cake will slowly absorb the meringue over time. If desired, after frosting a cake, the exterior layer of meringue can be toasted like a marshmallow using a culinary blowtorch.

Troubleshooting: While the approximate cooking times for the water bath are estimations at best, and will naturally vary from kitchen to kitchen, substantially missing the mark indicates heats that are vastly too high or low. When the meringue cooks much too fast, it is prone to scrambling, regardless of how thoroughly the bowl is scraped, resulting in a lumpy texture and eggy flavor. When the meringue is cooked too slowly, excess evaporation will dry the meringue, making it grainy and dense. In either event, adjusting the heat as needed will resolve the issue.


Scroll through the photos to see how to make 7 Minute Frosting with a stand mixer:

Combine the egg whites, sugar and cream of tarter in a mixing bowl.

Whisk the egg whites over simmering water until the temperature reaches 160°F.

Transfer the bowl to the mixer and whisk until the meringue is at full peak. About 4-5 minutes.

Tips for making and storing Seven Minute Icing:

  • I always use fresh egg whites. If you use pasteurized egg whites from a carton make sure the package says they can be used for meringue. Some markets sell pasteurized eggs still in the shell, those can also be used for this recipe.
  • Make sure your mixing bowl is absolutely clean. If there&rsquos a trace of grease or egg yolk the whites won&rsquot whip properly.
  • You can use a hand mixer and whip the whites for the traditional 7 minutes over water. I find mixing off the water easier.
  • The water under the bowl should be at a low simmer, not a full boil.
  • Make sure the water is not touching the bottom of the bowl.
  • Bring the whites to at least 160°F before removing from the heat. You can even go a bit higher to be sure the whites are hot enough to make a stable meringue.
  • The frosting must be used right after it&rsquos made. Once it&rsquos made it will begin to set and will be difficult to spread.
  • You can toast Seven Minute Frosting with a blow torch or under a broiler for a pretty finish.

This is the perfect frosting for Lemon Meringue Cupcakes!

Now that you&rsquove made this recipe what should you do with the extra yolks? Check out this collection of recipes that use extra yolks for some great ideas.

If you love this light and fluffy frosting you should try making Swiss Meringue Buttercream. It&rsquos exactly the same, but with the addition of butter.

If you love this recipe as much as I do, I&rsquod really appreciate a 5-star review.


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