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States with the Most McDonald’s and What It Means (Slideshow)

States with the Most McDonald’s and What It Means (Slideshow)


Who's eating the most McDonald's and why? Here's a state-by-state breakdown

11: Virginia

Virginia has about 445 McDonald’s locations throughout the state. As for its obesity rate, it has the highest out of the 11 states noted oin our list, clocking in at 33.8 percent up from 27.7 percent in 2003 and 13.7 percent in 1990. Back in 2000, a woman received an unwanted surprise in a box of chicken wings from McDonald’s — an entire chicken head, which made quite a big splash in the press.

10: North Carolina

North Carolina has roughly 475 McDonalds’ and an adult obesity rate of 29.6 percent up from 24 percent in 2003 and 12.3 percent in 1990. It is worth noting that North Carolina is home to the first LEED- certified McDonald’s restaurant located at 1299 Kildaire Farm Road which opened in July 2009.

9: Georgia

Georgia clocks in with roughly 511 McDonalds’ locations throughout its state. The adult obesity rate for the state is 29.1 percent up from 25.2 percent in 2003 and 10.1 percent in 1990. Childhood obesity is also an issue in the state. Nonprofit organization Strong4Life was created in Atlanta to address the childhood obesity epidemic. It partnered with Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta to design an ad campaign around childhood obesity to bring attention to the issue.

8: Pennsylvania

The state of Pennsylvania has roughly 583 McDonald's locations. Comparatively, the state’s adult obesity rate is 29.1 percent, up from 23.8 percent in 2003 and 13.7 percent in 1990. According to an “F as in Fat Report: How Obesity Threatens Americans Future” released in 2012, reducing the average body mass index in Pennsylvania by 5% could translate to an $8 billion savings in health care costs in the next 10 years and $24 billion in 20 years.

7: Michigan

Michigan has 631 McDonalds’ locations throughout the state. As for its obesity rate, it has a 31.1 percent obesity rate up from 25.2 percent in 2003 and 13.2 percent in 1990. In 2013, two McDonald's restaurants in Detroit that were serving food prepared according to Islamic law were forced to after a $700,000 settlement over a lawsuit that alleged the items weren't consistently halal.

6: Illinois

Illinois has a large amount of McDonald's clocking in at 738. It also happens to have a rather high obesity rate in the US with 28% of adults being obese, up from 23.2 percent in 2003 and 12.1 percent in 1990. Des Plaines, Illinois is where McDonald’s founder, Ray Kroc opened the first McDonald's restaurant that we know today in 1955, after launching the brand in San Bernardino, California several years earlier.

5: New York

New York State has 767 McDonalds’ locations. New York is the fourth least obese state in the United States and has an obesity rate of 23.6 percent up from 20.9 percent in 2003 and from 9.3 percent in 1990. Manhattan is home to one of the most upscale McDonalds’ in the world, located at 160 Broadway The outpost features a doorman, marble tables, a private dining room, grand piano, wait staff and live music.

4: Ohio

The state of Ohio has a high adult obesity rate of over 30 percent. It also has roughly 822 McDonald’s in the state. Many McDonald's across the country once offered the McPizza and one location in particular in Pomeroy, offered family sized and personal sized pizzas up until 2013.

3: Florida

Florida has 986 McDonald’s locations throughout the state. Its adult obesity rate is 25.2 percent up from 19.9 percent in 2003 and 11.4 percent in 1990. However, there are thirteen states in the U.S. that now have adult obesity rates over 30 percent. Florida is also home to one of the largest McDonald’s locations in the world in Orlando. The restaurant is shaped after a giant order their classic French fries.

2: Texas

Texas has 1225 McDonalds’ throughout the state. Its adult obesity rate is higher than states like California and comes in with 29.2 percent, which is up from 24.6 percent in 2003 and 10.7 percent in 1990. And according to the Texas Department of State Health Services, Texas is also facing an issue with growing childhood obesity, affecting children as early as grade school.

1: California

California ranks first on our list with a whopping 1492 McDonald’s locations within the state. However, the state is the 11th least obese state in the nation. In terms of its obesity rates, its adult obesity rate is 25 percent up from 23.2 percent in 2003 and 9.9 percent in 1990. California is where the McDonald’s story first began. The founder Ray Kroc began his restaurant empire in San Bernardino in 1948 with a very limited menu with a few items such as burgers, fries, and beverages.


McDonald's Is Planning to Change How They Make Their Beloved Menu Items

One of the country's most cherished fast-food chains has been busy announcing new menu additions and cuts in recent weeks. But they're also changing how some items are being created in order to cut greenhouse gas emissions.

McDonald's is joining other brands like Target, Cargill, and The Nature Conservancy to reduce their carbon footprint. The partnership is putting $8.5 million toward improving soil and crops in farms in Nebraska. The state is a major supplier of McDonald's beef.

The companies are hoping to put carbon into 100,000 acres of soil in the next five years, creating a healthier cycle of soil, crops, and animals. The efforts could get rid of a huge amount of carbon dioxide in the air — about 150,000 metric tons. This is equal to taking 32,000 cars off the road, according to their statement.

The partnership is using several methods to create healthier soil. One is called cover cropping and prevents soil erosion and nutrient depletion by simply covering the soil. Another limits soil tilling. A third adds different crops to each rotation to put nutrients back into the soil. Making sure the soil is as eco-friendly and hearty as possible means crops are healthy. The animals that eat the crops, like the ones used for McDonald's beef, are healthier then, too.

"Sustainable and regenerative farming practices improve soil health and the soil's ability to absorb carbon and remove it from the atmosphere, while also achieving better air and water quality, and potentially higher agricultural yields," the statement says. "Farmers are at the center of this work – and we want to support them to help advance and scale these climate solutions."

The partnership is part of McDonald's Science Based Targets plan to reduce its carbon emissions by 36% in restaurants and offices, and 31% within the supply chain by 2030.

They aren't the only chain looking to reduce their carbon footprint. At the beginning of the year, Starbucks announced its sustainability plan. One goal is to expand plant-based offerings — and they did just that earlier this summer with the launch of the Impossible breakfast sandwich.


McDonald's Is Planning to Change How They Make Their Beloved Menu Items

One of the country's most cherished fast-food chains has been busy announcing new menu additions and cuts in recent weeks. But they're also changing how some items are being created in order to cut greenhouse gas emissions.

McDonald's is joining other brands like Target, Cargill, and The Nature Conservancy to reduce their carbon footprint. The partnership is putting $8.5 million toward improving soil and crops in farms in Nebraska. The state is a major supplier of McDonald's beef.

The companies are hoping to put carbon into 100,000 acres of soil in the next five years, creating a healthier cycle of soil, crops, and animals. The efforts could get rid of a huge amount of carbon dioxide in the air — about 150,000 metric tons. This is equal to taking 32,000 cars off the road, according to their statement.

The partnership is using several methods to create healthier soil. One is called cover cropping and prevents soil erosion and nutrient depletion by simply covering the soil. Another limits soil tilling. A third adds different crops to each rotation to put nutrients back into the soil. Making sure the soil is as eco-friendly and hearty as possible means crops are healthy. The animals that eat the crops, like the ones used for McDonald's beef, are healthier then, too.

"Sustainable and regenerative farming practices improve soil health and the soil's ability to absorb carbon and remove it from the atmosphere, while also achieving better air and water quality, and potentially higher agricultural yields," the statement says. "Farmers are at the center of this work – and we want to support them to help advance and scale these climate solutions."

The partnership is part of McDonald's Science Based Targets plan to reduce its carbon emissions by 36% in restaurants and offices, and 31% within the supply chain by 2030.

They aren't the only chain looking to reduce their carbon footprint. At the beginning of the year, Starbucks announced its sustainability plan. One goal is to expand plant-based offerings — and they did just that earlier this summer with the launch of the Impossible breakfast sandwich.


McDonald's Is Planning to Change How They Make Their Beloved Menu Items

One of the country's most cherished fast-food chains has been busy announcing new menu additions and cuts in recent weeks. But they're also changing how some items are being created in order to cut greenhouse gas emissions.

McDonald's is joining other brands like Target, Cargill, and The Nature Conservancy to reduce their carbon footprint. The partnership is putting $8.5 million toward improving soil and crops in farms in Nebraska. The state is a major supplier of McDonald's beef.

The companies are hoping to put carbon into 100,000 acres of soil in the next five years, creating a healthier cycle of soil, crops, and animals. The efforts could get rid of a huge amount of carbon dioxide in the air — about 150,000 metric tons. This is equal to taking 32,000 cars off the road, according to their statement.

The partnership is using several methods to create healthier soil. One is called cover cropping and prevents soil erosion and nutrient depletion by simply covering the soil. Another limits soil tilling. A third adds different crops to each rotation to put nutrients back into the soil. Making sure the soil is as eco-friendly and hearty as possible means crops are healthy. The animals that eat the crops, like the ones used for McDonald's beef, are healthier then, too.

"Sustainable and regenerative farming practices improve soil health and the soil's ability to absorb carbon and remove it from the atmosphere, while also achieving better air and water quality, and potentially higher agricultural yields," the statement says. "Farmers are at the center of this work – and we want to support them to help advance and scale these climate solutions."

The partnership is part of McDonald's Science Based Targets plan to reduce its carbon emissions by 36% in restaurants and offices, and 31% within the supply chain by 2030.

They aren't the only chain looking to reduce their carbon footprint. At the beginning of the year, Starbucks announced its sustainability plan. One goal is to expand plant-based offerings — and they did just that earlier this summer with the launch of the Impossible breakfast sandwich.


McDonald's Is Planning to Change How They Make Their Beloved Menu Items

One of the country's most cherished fast-food chains has been busy announcing new menu additions and cuts in recent weeks. But they're also changing how some items are being created in order to cut greenhouse gas emissions.

McDonald's is joining other brands like Target, Cargill, and The Nature Conservancy to reduce their carbon footprint. The partnership is putting $8.5 million toward improving soil and crops in farms in Nebraska. The state is a major supplier of McDonald's beef.

The companies are hoping to put carbon into 100,000 acres of soil in the next five years, creating a healthier cycle of soil, crops, and animals. The efforts could get rid of a huge amount of carbon dioxide in the air — about 150,000 metric tons. This is equal to taking 32,000 cars off the road, according to their statement.

The partnership is using several methods to create healthier soil. One is called cover cropping and prevents soil erosion and nutrient depletion by simply covering the soil. Another limits soil tilling. A third adds different crops to each rotation to put nutrients back into the soil. Making sure the soil is as eco-friendly and hearty as possible means crops are healthy. The animals that eat the crops, like the ones used for McDonald's beef, are healthier then, too.

"Sustainable and regenerative farming practices improve soil health and the soil's ability to absorb carbon and remove it from the atmosphere, while also achieving better air and water quality, and potentially higher agricultural yields," the statement says. "Farmers are at the center of this work – and we want to support them to help advance and scale these climate solutions."

The partnership is part of McDonald's Science Based Targets plan to reduce its carbon emissions by 36% in restaurants and offices, and 31% within the supply chain by 2030.

They aren't the only chain looking to reduce their carbon footprint. At the beginning of the year, Starbucks announced its sustainability plan. One goal is to expand plant-based offerings — and they did just that earlier this summer with the launch of the Impossible breakfast sandwich.


McDonald's Is Planning to Change How They Make Their Beloved Menu Items

One of the country's most cherished fast-food chains has been busy announcing new menu additions and cuts in recent weeks. But they're also changing how some items are being created in order to cut greenhouse gas emissions.

McDonald's is joining other brands like Target, Cargill, and The Nature Conservancy to reduce their carbon footprint. The partnership is putting $8.5 million toward improving soil and crops in farms in Nebraska. The state is a major supplier of McDonald's beef.

The companies are hoping to put carbon into 100,000 acres of soil in the next five years, creating a healthier cycle of soil, crops, and animals. The efforts could get rid of a huge amount of carbon dioxide in the air — about 150,000 metric tons. This is equal to taking 32,000 cars off the road, according to their statement.

The partnership is using several methods to create healthier soil. One is called cover cropping and prevents soil erosion and nutrient depletion by simply covering the soil. Another limits soil tilling. A third adds different crops to each rotation to put nutrients back into the soil. Making sure the soil is as eco-friendly and hearty as possible means crops are healthy. The animals that eat the crops, like the ones used for McDonald's beef, are healthier then, too.

"Sustainable and regenerative farming practices improve soil health and the soil's ability to absorb carbon and remove it from the atmosphere, while also achieving better air and water quality, and potentially higher agricultural yields," the statement says. "Farmers are at the center of this work – and we want to support them to help advance and scale these climate solutions."

The partnership is part of McDonald's Science Based Targets plan to reduce its carbon emissions by 36% in restaurants and offices, and 31% within the supply chain by 2030.

They aren't the only chain looking to reduce their carbon footprint. At the beginning of the year, Starbucks announced its sustainability plan. One goal is to expand plant-based offerings — and they did just that earlier this summer with the launch of the Impossible breakfast sandwich.


McDonald's Is Planning to Change How They Make Their Beloved Menu Items

One of the country's most cherished fast-food chains has been busy announcing new menu additions and cuts in recent weeks. But they're also changing how some items are being created in order to cut greenhouse gas emissions.

McDonald's is joining other brands like Target, Cargill, and The Nature Conservancy to reduce their carbon footprint. The partnership is putting $8.5 million toward improving soil and crops in farms in Nebraska. The state is a major supplier of McDonald's beef.

The companies are hoping to put carbon into 100,000 acres of soil in the next five years, creating a healthier cycle of soil, crops, and animals. The efforts could get rid of a huge amount of carbon dioxide in the air — about 150,000 metric tons. This is equal to taking 32,000 cars off the road, according to their statement.

The partnership is using several methods to create healthier soil. One is called cover cropping and prevents soil erosion and nutrient depletion by simply covering the soil. Another limits soil tilling. A third adds different crops to each rotation to put nutrients back into the soil. Making sure the soil is as eco-friendly and hearty as possible means crops are healthy. The animals that eat the crops, like the ones used for McDonald's beef, are healthier then, too.

"Sustainable and regenerative farming practices improve soil health and the soil's ability to absorb carbon and remove it from the atmosphere, while also achieving better air and water quality, and potentially higher agricultural yields," the statement says. "Farmers are at the center of this work – and we want to support them to help advance and scale these climate solutions."

The partnership is part of McDonald's Science Based Targets plan to reduce its carbon emissions by 36% in restaurants and offices, and 31% within the supply chain by 2030.

They aren't the only chain looking to reduce their carbon footprint. At the beginning of the year, Starbucks announced its sustainability plan. One goal is to expand plant-based offerings — and they did just that earlier this summer with the launch of the Impossible breakfast sandwich.


McDonald's Is Planning to Change How They Make Their Beloved Menu Items

One of the country's most cherished fast-food chains has been busy announcing new menu additions and cuts in recent weeks. But they're also changing how some items are being created in order to cut greenhouse gas emissions.

McDonald's is joining other brands like Target, Cargill, and The Nature Conservancy to reduce their carbon footprint. The partnership is putting $8.5 million toward improving soil and crops in farms in Nebraska. The state is a major supplier of McDonald's beef.

The companies are hoping to put carbon into 100,000 acres of soil in the next five years, creating a healthier cycle of soil, crops, and animals. The efforts could get rid of a huge amount of carbon dioxide in the air — about 150,000 metric tons. This is equal to taking 32,000 cars off the road, according to their statement.

The partnership is using several methods to create healthier soil. One is called cover cropping and prevents soil erosion and nutrient depletion by simply covering the soil. Another limits soil tilling. A third adds different crops to each rotation to put nutrients back into the soil. Making sure the soil is as eco-friendly and hearty as possible means crops are healthy. The animals that eat the crops, like the ones used for McDonald's beef, are healthier then, too.

"Sustainable and regenerative farming practices improve soil health and the soil's ability to absorb carbon and remove it from the atmosphere, while also achieving better air and water quality, and potentially higher agricultural yields," the statement says. "Farmers are at the center of this work – and we want to support them to help advance and scale these climate solutions."

The partnership is part of McDonald's Science Based Targets plan to reduce its carbon emissions by 36% in restaurants and offices, and 31% within the supply chain by 2030.

They aren't the only chain looking to reduce their carbon footprint. At the beginning of the year, Starbucks announced its sustainability plan. One goal is to expand plant-based offerings — and they did just that earlier this summer with the launch of the Impossible breakfast sandwich.


McDonald's Is Planning to Change How They Make Their Beloved Menu Items

One of the country's most cherished fast-food chains has been busy announcing new menu additions and cuts in recent weeks. But they're also changing how some items are being created in order to cut greenhouse gas emissions.

McDonald's is joining other brands like Target, Cargill, and The Nature Conservancy to reduce their carbon footprint. The partnership is putting $8.5 million toward improving soil and crops in farms in Nebraska. The state is a major supplier of McDonald's beef.

The companies are hoping to put carbon into 100,000 acres of soil in the next five years, creating a healthier cycle of soil, crops, and animals. The efforts could get rid of a huge amount of carbon dioxide in the air — about 150,000 metric tons. This is equal to taking 32,000 cars off the road, according to their statement.

The partnership is using several methods to create healthier soil. One is called cover cropping and prevents soil erosion and nutrient depletion by simply covering the soil. Another limits soil tilling. A third adds different crops to each rotation to put nutrients back into the soil. Making sure the soil is as eco-friendly and hearty as possible means crops are healthy. The animals that eat the crops, like the ones used for McDonald's beef, are healthier then, too.

"Sustainable and regenerative farming practices improve soil health and the soil's ability to absorb carbon and remove it from the atmosphere, while also achieving better air and water quality, and potentially higher agricultural yields," the statement says. "Farmers are at the center of this work – and we want to support them to help advance and scale these climate solutions."

The partnership is part of McDonald's Science Based Targets plan to reduce its carbon emissions by 36% in restaurants and offices, and 31% within the supply chain by 2030.

They aren't the only chain looking to reduce their carbon footprint. At the beginning of the year, Starbucks announced its sustainability plan. One goal is to expand plant-based offerings — and they did just that earlier this summer with the launch of the Impossible breakfast sandwich.


McDonald's Is Planning to Change How They Make Their Beloved Menu Items

One of the country's most cherished fast-food chains has been busy announcing new menu additions and cuts in recent weeks. But they're also changing how some items are being created in order to cut greenhouse gas emissions.

McDonald's is joining other brands like Target, Cargill, and The Nature Conservancy to reduce their carbon footprint. The partnership is putting $8.5 million toward improving soil and crops in farms in Nebraska. The state is a major supplier of McDonald's beef.

The companies are hoping to put carbon into 100,000 acres of soil in the next five years, creating a healthier cycle of soil, crops, and animals. The efforts could get rid of a huge amount of carbon dioxide in the air — about 150,000 metric tons. This is equal to taking 32,000 cars off the road, according to their statement.

The partnership is using several methods to create healthier soil. One is called cover cropping and prevents soil erosion and nutrient depletion by simply covering the soil. Another limits soil tilling. A third adds different crops to each rotation to put nutrients back into the soil. Making sure the soil is as eco-friendly and hearty as possible means crops are healthy. The animals that eat the crops, like the ones used for McDonald's beef, are healthier then, too.

"Sustainable and regenerative farming practices improve soil health and the soil's ability to absorb carbon and remove it from the atmosphere, while also achieving better air and water quality, and potentially higher agricultural yields," the statement says. "Farmers are at the center of this work – and we want to support them to help advance and scale these climate solutions."

The partnership is part of McDonald's Science Based Targets plan to reduce its carbon emissions by 36% in restaurants and offices, and 31% within the supply chain by 2030.

They aren't the only chain looking to reduce their carbon footprint. At the beginning of the year, Starbucks announced its sustainability plan. One goal is to expand plant-based offerings — and they did just that earlier this summer with the launch of the Impossible breakfast sandwich.


McDonald's Is Planning to Change How They Make Their Beloved Menu Items

One of the country's most cherished fast-food chains has been busy announcing new menu additions and cuts in recent weeks. But they're also changing how some items are being created in order to cut greenhouse gas emissions.

McDonald's is joining other brands like Target, Cargill, and The Nature Conservancy to reduce their carbon footprint. The partnership is putting $8.5 million toward improving soil and crops in farms in Nebraska. The state is a major supplier of McDonald's beef.

The companies are hoping to put carbon into 100,000 acres of soil in the next five years, creating a healthier cycle of soil, crops, and animals. The efforts could get rid of a huge amount of carbon dioxide in the air — about 150,000 metric tons. This is equal to taking 32,000 cars off the road, according to their statement.

The partnership is using several methods to create healthier soil. One is called cover cropping and prevents soil erosion and nutrient depletion by simply covering the soil. Another limits soil tilling. A third adds different crops to each rotation to put nutrients back into the soil. Making sure the soil is as eco-friendly and hearty as possible means crops are healthy. The animals that eat the crops, like the ones used for McDonald's beef, are healthier then, too.

"Sustainable and regenerative farming practices improve soil health and the soil's ability to absorb carbon and remove it from the atmosphere, while also achieving better air and water quality, and potentially higher agricultural yields," the statement says. "Farmers are at the center of this work – and we want to support them to help advance and scale these climate solutions."

The partnership is part of McDonald's Science Based Targets plan to reduce its carbon emissions by 36% in restaurants and offices, and 31% within the supply chain by 2030.

They aren't the only chain looking to reduce their carbon footprint. At the beginning of the year, Starbucks announced its sustainability plan. One goal is to expand plant-based offerings — and they did just that earlier this summer with the launch of the Impossible breakfast sandwich.