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Oatmeal Cookies

Oatmeal Cookies


Until Bob’s Red Mill came up with a totally affordable gluten-free oat, you would never have seen these in the bakery. If you’re some sort of oat maniac, you can dump in as much as another 1/3 cup of oats and be just fine.

Notes

Reprinted with permission from BabyCakes Covers the Classics by Erin McKenna and Tara Donne, copyright © 2011. Published by Clarkson Potter, a division of Random House, Inc.

Ingredients

  • 1 3/4 Cup Bob's Red Mill all-purpose gluten-free baking flour
  • 1 Cup vegan sugar
  • 1/2 Cup Bob's Red Mill gluten-free oats
  • 1/4 Cup ground flax meal
  • 2 Tablespoons ground cinnamon
  • 1 1/2 Teaspoon xanthan gum
  • 1 Teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 Teaspoon salt
  • 1 Cup melted refined coconut oil or canola oil
  • 1/2 Cup unsweetened applesauce
  • 2 Tablespoons vanilla extract
  • 3/4 Cups raisins

Servings12

Calories Per Serving365

Folate equivalent (total)9µg2%


Recipe Summary

  • ¾ cup butter, softened
  • 1 cup packed brown sugar
  • ½ cup granulated sugar
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • ¼ teaspoon baking soda
  • ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon (optional)
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cloves (optional)
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1 ¾ cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 cups rolled oats

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. In a large mixing bowl, beat butter with an electric mixer on medium to high speed for 30 seconds. Add brown sugar, granulated sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and, if desired, cinnamon and cloves. Beat until combined, scraping side of bowl occasionally. Beat in eggs and vanilla until combined. Beat in as much of the flour as you can with the mixer. Using a wooden spoon, stir in any remaining flour. Stir in rolled oats.

Drop dough by rounded teaspoons 2 inches apart onto ungreased cookie sheets. Bake for 8 to 10 minutes or until edges are golden. Let stand on cookie sheets for 1 minute. Transfer to wire racks and let cool. Makes about 48 cookies.


Healthier Oatmeal Cookies

Healthier cookies can be tricky to figure out, and this one was no exception. It went through rounds and rounds of testing. But we're proud to say that what we landed on is a really good COOKIE&mdashnot a granola bar that's just shaped like one.

So what makes this one &ldquohealthy&rdquo? We decreased the usual amounts of butter and sugar with some help from applesauce, which provides sweetness and moisture to the dough without additional fat. The cookie is mostly oats, with just 1/4 cup of whole-wheat flour&mdashthere&rsquos no ultra-refined starches here. But a cookie isn&rsquot a cookie unless it&rsquos a little naughty&mdashso we added some quality dark chocolate chunks and tart dried cherries for the perfect bite. Everything in moderation!

Can I swap out all of the butter for applesauce?

Not recommended. Excessive moisture from the applesauce can turn your cookie dense and rubbery. Creaming the butter and sugar together will help provide lift to your cookie, adding the perfect amount of airiness.

Do I need to use both kinds of oats?

If you like a textured cookie, yes. The quick oats act more like a flour while the old-fashioned oats add bite and nuttiness. Too much quick oats and you&rsquoll miss out on some of the depth of flavor and mouthfeel too much old-fashioned oats and you'll give your jaw quite a workout.

Can I make the dough ahead of time?

You can, but the oats might absorb too much moisture and bloat. Depending on how long you let the dough sit in the fridge before baking, the resulting cookie might not have the soft texture we want you to experience.

Can I substitute other dried fruits or different kinds of chocolate?

Anything your heart desires. Raisins, dried cranberries, and dried currants will work just fine. And if you don&rsquot mind a little knife work, chopped dried apricots, dried pears, and candied ginger will all be delicious. You can use any chocolate you want, or if you&rsquore feeling adventurous, you can even experiment with different nuts as a substitute. We love toasted pecans for a nice little crunch.

If you've made this recipe, we'd love to hear from you down below in the comments. Leave us a rating and let us know how you liked the cookies!


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This is my go-to base recipe for nourishing any new mom. I call them my BM/Lac cookies (you’ll know if you know). I increase the wet ingredients by half and add in flax seeds, prunes, orange zest, walnuts, chocolate chips, sesame seeds, pumpkin seeds, etc.. Sometimes I make these with whole wheat flour, sometimes with GF flour. All this to say, this is a wonderful , versatile recipe.

Solid cookie recipe. Mine come out exactly as pictured. I've made this recipe several times and my family loves it. I always make substitutions depending on what I have on hand or my mood, but it doesn't change the result - almond flour for all-purpose, different sugars, coconut butter, etc. It is slightly sweet for us, so we just cut back a little on our sugars. The oatmeal gives a good texture and the combined sugars give the carmelized crunch and sweetness. They stayed fresh in an airtight container for 3-4 days.

Mine came out well. They may look burnt but thats from the caramelization of the sugar. Crispy outside, and chewed inside. Doesn't loose the oatmeal texture. Will make again.

Not sweet enough. Will not make again.

I made these cookies on a snowy day with the ingredients I had on hand, and they fit the bill since I like crunchy cookies. Not a fan of cinnamon in oatmeal cookies, so I left out that ingredient, but I added 1/2 cup of chopped pecans. This recipe is a keeper.

Finally I found my perfect oatmeal cookie recipe (with a little tweaking). We like our cookies not too sweet so I only used 1/2 cup of very lightly packed light brown sugar and no white sugar. I also reduced the cinnamon to 1/2 teaspoon as I do not like it to dominate the cookie. I added 2/3 cup raisins to my dry ingredients. The secret is to beaten the wet ingredients then fold in the dry ingredients with a rubber spatula. I use a Silpat sheet instead of greasing my baking sheet. 10 minutes baked these perfectly. Let cool on the sheet 5 minutes before transferring to a rack. Since there are only 2 of us I've been baking half quantities (12 cookies) so we get to enjoy them warm and fresh. With the sugar drastically reduced you can even eat them for breakfast!

I had great luck with this recipe. I've always had trouble with oatmeal cookies that are too crisp and flatten in the oven, then too crumbly in the cookie jar. These stayed thick, are soft and a bit chewy, and haven't fallen apart in storage. I didn't beat the sugar/fat mixture until completely smooth at first. I left a few chunks of fat, then added egg, then beat it all smooth. It does seem that the sugar/fat/egg process greatly affects the outcome, whether runny in the oven, thick and soft, thin and chewy. but I'll make this recipe again now that I've had my first chewy success and see what it takes to make it fail so I can finally break the code and understand why this cookie turned out so well for me. delicious, by the way. once I perfect the recipe, I'll see how some raisins or cranberries affect the outcome, and try a less sweet version to see if I can crack the code of a good oatmeal breakfast cookie for road trips.

Looks like they'll taste good ,but when we put them in the oven they started to burn. when we took them out of the oven they were very runny and the edges started to burn. AKA we put walnuts and choclate chips in it. we had extra dough to make another sheet but we ate the dough (delicious) we did nothing wrong with the recipe ( i think the recipe is mixed up) #TYPO

Tasty cookies, followed recipe with some exceptions. Substituted brown sugar for raw cane sugar, added half a cup of walnuts and 1/4 tsp of nutmeg with 1 tsp of orange zest. Cooked on convection for 10 minutes which left them crunchy on the outside and chewy in the middle. Very yummy!

Very nice cookie with a great texture - crunchy/crispy outside, soft inside. Also has a hint of saltiness, which I like, giving them a bit of a sweet 'n salty flavour akin to salted caramel. I made a couple tweaks: I didn't have enough butter, so used 50% vegetable oil. I also added a handful of dark chocolate chips, and a handful of walnut pieces.

A simple recipe yielding excellent results. I will keep this as my staple. Thanks!

Very mediocre cookie. Disappointing.

I made a mistake! Ignore my review below. I had a brain fart and grabbed baking powder instead of baking soda. However, I still wanted a recipe with more brown sugar. But potato potato, I screwed up

I wasn't happy with this cookie. It spread out a lot. Oh well. I also followed the recipe unlike most people.

I added 1/3 cup dried cranberries and substituted Cannabutter instead of real butter. Excellent results!

I like the recipe but modified it by reducing the butter by 1/2 and added a ripe banana.

Fabulous recipe! Made just as written, but added 1/2 cup for chopped dates. Chewy/crisp and very moist. Will make again, but double the recipe next time:)

I liked this recipe well enough, but I thought they were a little dry. Not crispy¿dry. Perhaps they were dry because I used Bob's Red Mill extra thick rolled oats. I followed the recipe as specified, except I added a handful of chocolate chips.

These cookies are very good. Mine came out tender, yet slightly crisp on the edges. I baked mine in a convection oven for 11 minutes. They came out very dark golden. Next time I will bake them for 10 minutes. I added 3/4 cup of raisins.

After seeing so many fine reviews on this recipe I decided to try it. The cookies were absolutely fantastic. I did tweak it a little but nothing major. I also added dried cranberries and orange zest.

This is just the recipe I was looking for: simple, easy, and amenable to many additions. Because of allergies, I used maple sugar and kamut and amaranth flours. I added walnuts and raisins, and baked them 12 minutes. The result was a tender cookie with a delicate, crunchy shell and outstanding flavor. So pleased!

I made this recipe exactly as written, and it turned out 25 delicious cookies. Baking for 12 minutes produces a dark golden crunchy cookie, so I baked for 10 minutes for soft bite instead. It's a simple recipe that will lend itself to many substitutions and additions. Next time I will use less salt and add nuts per my family's tastes. This is a keeper!

These were great, I replaced part of the flour with whole wheat flour, next time I'll try using only wheat flour, they were great. I added chocolate chips - tasty! My healthy husband loved them.

Oh Man, I added some dark chocolate chips to these, they hand the perfect mix of crunch around the outside edge and chewiness in the middle. They perfectly satisfied my chocolate craving!

I can't say enough about this recipe. Chewy, soft and flavorful these cookies are excellent! Maybe one of the best recipes for oatmeal cookies out there. I used 1/2 cup light brown sugar and substituted oat flour for the all purpose. I imagine they would be fabulous with nuts and raisins or chocolate chips or both!


Recipe Summary

  • 1 cup packed light-brown sugar
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/2 pound (2 sticks) unsalted butter, room temperature
  • 2 large eggs, room temperature
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • 3 cups rolled oats
  • 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 cup wheat germ
  • 12 ounces good-quality chocolate, chopped into chunks, or 1 1/2 cups golden raisins, or 10 ounces toffee pieces

Heat oven to 350 degrees. Combine the brown sugar, granulated sugar, and butter in an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment. Starting with the mixer on low speed and increasing until it is on medium, beat until the mixture is creamy and fluffy, about 5 minutes. Add the eggs and the vanilla extract, then scrape the sides of the bowl with a rubber spatula, and mix to combine.

Combine the rolled oats, flour, baking soda, baking powder, and wheat germ in a large bowl, and stir to combine. Add the dry mixture to the butter mixture, then mix on low speed just to combine, 10 to 15 seconds. Remove the bowl from mixer stand, and stir in your choice of chocolate chunks, golden raisins, or toffee pieces.

Line the baking pans with parchment paper. Use a large (2 1/2 ounce) or small (1 1/4 ounce) ice-cream scoop to form balls of dough. Place the balls of dough about 4 inches apart on baking pans. Bake until golden and just set, about 18 minutes for large cookies and 14 minutes for small cookies. Remove from oven let cool on pan 4 to 5 minutes before transferring to a cooling rack.


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Oatmeal Cookies are soft and chewy with a brown sugar, vanilla, and cinnamon flavors. This oatmeal cookie recipe is about as easy and old fashioned as it gets, and it’s definitely one of my personal favorite cookie recipes. You can add any seasonal spices you’d like to these cookies, like nutmeg, pumpkin pie spice, or allspice. I’ve also made these with dried cranberries and butterscotch chips before, and they were a big hit with my family!

As far as desserts go, these definitely disappear the fastest. I also use an ice cream scoop to help make each cookie the same size. One of the best tips I’ve learned to make tasty cookies is to mix your dry ingredients together before mixing everything else in. This makes sure everything gets mixed evenly, and you’ll have much better results for it.

Oats are an ingredients I love using in recipes including Ultimate Apple Crisp, one of the most popular dessert recipes on the site.

WHICH OATMEAL IS BEST FOR COOKIES?

You have a few options when choosing oats for oatmeal cookies. A lot of recipes will call for old fashioned rolled oats, and they do add a lot of chewy texture to the cookie.

Personally, I like to use quick cooking oats for two reasons. First, quick oats tend to make the cookie softer. Second, it’s what I always have in my house. Instant oatmeal also cooks faster (even in cookie form), and in my opinion tastes the same as the rolled oats.

Honestly, no matter which oat you choose, the cookies are going to taste incredible, it’s just a texture preference.

WHAT KIND OF NUTS CAN YOU USE IN OATMEAL COOKIES?

For this oatmeal cookie recipe you can add chopped pecans, walnuts, or almonds. Either one of these would taste good and add some crunch to the cookie.

CAN YOU FREEZE OATMEAL COOKIES?

Oatmeal cookies can be frozen in both finished cookie or dough form. For fully cooked cookies, make sure they’re at room temperature before wrapping them tightly and freezing. When you’re ready, let them come to room temperature on the counter, or warm them in the oven at 300 degrees F for about 10 minutes before serving.

If you freeze the dough, you can either defrost it in the refrigerator and scoop it onto your cookie sheet when it’s soft enough, or freeze it already scooped out into individual cookies.

To do this, scoop your cookies onto the baking sheet and place the baking sheet in the freezer for 30-45 minutes, or until the dough is just starting to freeze. Then place the cookies in an airtight container with pieces of parchment paper in-between to keep them from sticking together.

Bake your cookies straight from frozen, adding 3-4 minutes to the normal cook time.

HOW TO MAKE COOKIES CHEWY:

  • Using a combo of brown sugar and white sugar like in my chocolate chip cookie recipe makes the best cookies.
  • Under bake by 1-2 minutes if you find your cookies are coming out more crisp than you’d like.
  • If you like your cookies crispy bake them for 12-13 minutes.
  • If you mix the flour too much in the recipe the cookies can be too dry.
  • If you scoop your flour instead of spooning it into your measure it can be too dry.
    • Spoon your flour into your measuring cup and level it off with a knife.

    HOW TO MAKE THESE OATMEAL COOKIES GLUTEN-FREE:

    A good substitute for flour in oatmeal cookies is instant oats. Be sure to add them to your food processor and process until its turned into a flour. Do not use rolled oats to make the flour, it will be too tough, instant oats can be pulverized much easier.

    WHY ARE MY COOKIES FLAT?

    Warm butter/Room temperature butter is usually the reason behind flat cookies. You need the steam from the cold butter to give the cookies that extra bit of lift to help give the extra height to these cookies. Be sure you don’t skip the refrigerating process in this recipe.

    I find instant oats can sometimes disintegrate into my batter throughout the cooking process and it also doesn’t really result in a good chewy cookie. Stick with the rolled oats, you won’t be disappointed.

    HOW TO MAKE OATMEAL COOKIES WITHOUT BROWN SUGAR?

    Brown sugar helps give the cookies a deep molasses flavor and golden brown color. If you find yourself without brown sugar, you can replace it cup for cup with white granulated sugar. Brown sugar also helps the cookies have their chewier texture, so watch your cooking time closely and be careful not to over bake to help keep more moisture in the cookie.


    Oatmeal Cookie Recipe: Ingredients

    Before we walk through how to make oatmeal cookies, let's chat about the ingredients in this oatmeal cookie recipe.

    • Butter. I use salted butter to make these oatmeal cookies. Unsalted butter also works well, you may just need to increase the amount of sea salt.
    • Egg. Try to make sure the egg is room temperature! I have not made this recipe with an egg substitute, so if you do let me know in the comments below!
    • Vanilla Extract. Please only use pure vanilla extract (not imitation) for the best taste!
    • Brown Sugar. I recommend light brown sugar for this oatmeal cookie recipe! However if you like a little bolder, molasses taste then you can use dark brown sugar!
    • Granulated Sugar. Organic cane sugar is my granulated sugar of choice, but regular granulated sugar works perfectly!
    • Cinnamon. Choose your favorite ground cinnamon! The higher the quality, the better it will taste!
    • Sea salt. I only ever bake with pure, fine sea salt. If you are using iodized salt I recommend decreasing the amount of salt by half.
    • Mix-ins. Adding mix-ins is optional. My husband prefers these oatmeal cookies without anything added, however I'll chat about possible add-ins later on!

    What kind of oats do you use for oatmeal cookies?

    For the perfect, chewy texture use old-fashioned (or rolled) oats.

    Can you use quick oats instead of old fashioned in oatmeal cookies?

    Yes, you can, just be aware that it will change the texture of the oatmeal cookies to be less chewy!


    Oatmeal Cookies

    Oats are the star of this cookie, and rightly so. Featuring the nutty taste and nubbly texture of oats, these mildly spiced cookies are crunchy around the edges and invitingly soft in the center. Add raisins or not, your choice they'll be a crowd favorite no matter what.

    Want to reduce the carbs and calories in this recipe? Substitute our King Arthur Baking Sugar Alternative for the sugar called for. See how in "tips," below.

    Ingredients

    • 4 tablespoons (57g) unsalted butter, softened
    • 1/4 cup (50g) vegetable shortening
    • 1/2 cup (106g) light brown sugar, packed
    • 1/4 cup (50g) granulated sugar
    • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
    • 1 1/4 teaspoons cinnamon
    • 1/8 teaspoon nutmeg
    • 1/2 teaspoon salt
    • 1 teaspoon cider or white vinegar*
    • 1 large egg
    • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
    • 3/4 cup (85g) King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour
    • 1 1/2 cups (134g) rolled oats, old-fashioned or quick-cooking
    • 1 cup (142g) golden raisins or Jammy Bits*

    Instructions

    Preheat the oven to 350°F. Lightly grease (or line with parchment) two baking sheets, light-colored preferred.

    Beat together the butter, shortening, sugars, vanilla, cinnamon, nutmeg, salt, and vinegar until fairly smooth a few tiny bits of butter may still show.

    Beat in the egg, again beating until smooth.

    Add the baking soda and flour, beating until well incorporated.

    Perfect your technique

    Guaranteed Oatmeal Cookies

    Add the oats (and raisins), stirring to combine.

    Drop the dough in 1 1/4" balls onto the prepared baking sheets a tablespoon cookie scoop works well here. If you're measuring, this is about 2 level tablespoons (using a tablespoon measure, not a dinner spoon). Space the cookies 2" apart they'll spread.

    Bake the cookies for 12 to 14 minutes, reversing the pans halfway through (top rack to bottom, bottom to top). For softer cookies, bake the lesser amount of time for crunchier, the longer amount. At 12 minutes, especially if you're baking on a dark pan without parchment, a few of the cookies on the edge should just barely be showing a pale brown around their edges. At 14 minutes, they should be starting to color all over.

    Remove the cookies from the oven, and let them cool right on the pan.

    Tips from our Bakers

    Looking for a gluten-free version of this recipe? Find it here: Gluten-Free Oatmeal Cookies.

    Here's an easy way to reduce the carbs and calories in this recipe: substitute King Arthur Baking Sugar Alternative, cup for cup, for the sugar(s) called for. Be sure to substitute by volume (not weight) follow mixing directions as written. Since our Baking Sugar Alternative will bake and brown more quickly, reduce the recipe's suggested oven temperature by 25 degrees and start checking cookies for doneness three-quarters of the way through the suggested bake time.

    Why vinegar in a cookie recipe? It helps cut the sweetness and also gives your baking soda a bit of a boost. Mystery solved!

    Jammy Bits, sweet, soft little morsels of fruit purée, come in five delicious flavors: blueberry, raspberry, cherry, apple cinnamon, and orange.


    Grandma's Oatmeal Cookies

    Elise founded Simply Recipes in 2003 and led the site until 2019. She has an MA in Food Research from Stanford University.

    I've been going through our family's stash of recipes and came across my grandmother's oatmeal cookie recipe. She passed away several years ago at age 97 (she was born in 1899).

    It's funny how just seeing my grandma's handwriting conjures up old memories of being a little girl and making these delicious old fashioned oatmeal cookies with her.

    She had a real sweet tooth and we are still amazed she lived so long given her penchant for cookies, lemon meringue pie, and jelly-filled donuts.

    My grandmother taught me how to measure, how to mix, and taught me a love of cooking, all through these homemade oatmeal cookies.


    Healthier Oatmeal Cookies

    Healthier cookies can be tricky to figure out, and this one was no exception. It went through rounds and rounds of testing. But we're proud to say that what we landed on is a really good COOKIE&mdashnot a granola bar that's just shaped like one.

    So what makes this one &ldquohealthy&rdquo? We decreased the usual amounts of butter and sugar with some help from applesauce, which provides sweetness and moisture to the dough without additional fat. The cookie is mostly oats, with just 1/4 cup of whole-wheat flour&mdashthere&rsquos no ultra-refined starches here. But a cookie isn&rsquot a cookie unless it&rsquos a little naughty&mdashso we added some quality dark chocolate chunks and tart dried cherries for the perfect bite. Everything in moderation!

    Can I swap out all of the butter for applesauce?

    Not recommended. Excessive moisture from the applesauce can turn your cookie dense and rubbery. Creaming the butter and sugar together will help provide lift to your cookie, adding the perfect amount of airiness.

    Do I need to use both kinds of oats?

    If you like a textured cookie, yes. The quick oats act more like a flour while the old-fashioned oats add bite and nuttiness. Too much quick oats and you&rsquoll miss out on some of the depth of flavor and mouthfeel too much old-fashioned oats and you'll give your jaw quite a workout.

    Can I make the dough ahead of time?

    You can, but the oats might absorb too much moisture and bloat. Depending on how long you let the dough sit in the fridge before baking, the resulting cookie might not have the soft texture we want you to experience.

    Can I substitute other dried fruits or different kinds of chocolate?

    Anything your heart desires. Raisins, dried cranberries, and dried currants will work just fine. And if you don&rsquot mind a little knife work, chopped dried apricots, dried pears, and candied ginger will all be delicious. You can use any chocolate you want, or if you&rsquore feeling adventurous, you can even experiment with different nuts as a substitute. We love toasted pecans for a nice little crunch.

    If you've made this recipe, we'd love to hear from you down below in the comments. Leave us a rating and let us know how you liked the cookies!