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10 Things You Didn’t Know About Dairy Queen

10 Things You Didn’t Know About Dairy Queen


The home of the Blizzard has loyal followers around the globe

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Dairy Queen is one of those chains that’s impossible to dislike. The chain that put not only soft-serve ice cream but also the legendary Blizzard on the map has thousands of locations across the globe, and new openings are still treated as special occasions. But even if you’ve got your perfect Blizzard order down pat, we bet that there are still some things you didn’t know about this legendary chain.

10 Things You Didn’t Know About Dairy Queen

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Dairy Queen is one of those chains that’s impossible to dislike. But even if you’ve got your perfect Blizzard order down pat, we bet that there are still some things you didn’t know about this legendary chain.

The Founders Also Invented Soft Serve

The concept of soft serve was developed in 1938 by John Fremont McCullough and his son Bradley. They partnered with ice cream shop owner Sheb Noble to open the first Dairy Queen in Joliet, Illinois, in 1940.

The First Location Is a City-Designated Landmark

Even though it hasn’t been a Dairy Queen since the 1950s, the first location, at 501 North Chicago Street in Joliet, is landmarked.

It Was a Pioneer of Franchising

Not many restaurants were selling franchise rights in the 1940s, but Dairy Queen used that strategy to expand from 10 stores in 1941 to 100 stores in 1947 and 1,600 by 1955.

Dairy Queen Owns Orange Julius

The Blizzard Was Inspired by a St. Louis Shop

Ted Drewes is a famous frozen custard shop located in Route 66 in St. Louis, a local landmark since the 1930s. The shop is best known for its concretes, in which frozen custard is blended with any of dozens of ingredients. DQ took its inspiration from this legendary creation, as did Shake Shack, who calls their creations concretes in homage.

A Healthier Blizzard Bombed

Dairy Queen rolled out the Breeze, a healthier take on the famous Blizzard, in 1990. Made using frozen yogurt instead of ice cream, it was discontinued in 2000 because sales were so sluggish that the frozen yogurt was spoiling before it could be used.

Texas Has More Dairy Queen Locations Than Any Other State

America’s Largest Dairy Queen Is in Bloomington, Illinois

The 5,000-square-foot restaurant boasts a 140-seat dining room, three fireplaces, flat-screen televisions, and a patio that seats an additional 40 guests. The largest Dairy Queen in the world, however, is located in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

There Are Locations in 31 Countries

Dairy Queen is one of America’s leading restaurant exports, with locations in countries including not just Saudi Arabia but Qatar, Kuwait, Gabon, Guyana, Cyprus, Brunei, Cambodia, Laos, Macau, and Taiwan.

It’s a Subsidiary of Berkshire Hathaway

Warren Buffett’s conglomerate purchased Dairy Queen in 1998. Would that make Buffett the Dairy King?


20 Things You Didn't Know About Dairy Queen

Whether you're craving a plain vanilla cone or an elaborate banana split, your local Dairy Queen has been the go-to spot for summertime soft-serve since 1940.

1. THE FIRST DQ WAS LOCATED IN JOLIET, ILLINOIS.

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To promote the new soft-serve store, founder Sherb Noble suggested an "all you can eat for 10 cents" sale. The promotion was so popular, Noble worried that the stampede of customers would break the glass windows of the store front.

2. A "BRAZIER" DAIRY QUEEN IS ONE THAT SERVES HOT FOOD IN ADDITION TO ICE CREAM.

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A "brazier," by the way, is another word for a charcoal grill.

3. THERE'S A RHYME AND REASON TO THE COMPANY'S NAME.

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The original store was deemed Dairy Queen because Jack "Grandpa" McCullough, the "driving force" behind DQ's soft serve, said his creation was a queen among dairy products.

4. DAIRY QUEEN'S SOFT SERVE RECIPE IS A HIGHLY GUARDED TRADE SECRET.

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And just like KFC and Coke, they'll never reveal the ingredients. "[The formula] is kept in a safe deposit box and there are only a few keys to it," DQ's chief branding officer, Michael Keller, has said.

5. NO DOUBT FORMED AT A DAIRY QUEEN IN 1986.

Donald Miralle, Getty Images

Gwen Stefani and her brother Eric worked with other founding member John Spence at an Anaheim store, where they discussed forming a band. Other celebrity DQ employees include former Attorney General John Ashcroft, actress Bonnie Hunt, and singer Martina McBride.

6. THOUGH DAIRY QUEEN HAS BEEN AROUND SINCE 1940, IT DIDN'T INTRODUCE ITS TRADEMARK BLIZZARDS UNTIL 1985.

Andrew Burton, Getty Images

They sold more than 175 million Blizzards in the very first year.

7. MANY FRANCHISES TURN BLIZZARDS UPSIDE DOWN IN FRONT OF CUSTOMERS BEFORE SERVING.

Frederic J. Brown, Getty Images

It's proof of how thick and delicious their soft-serve is—but it's also a total marketing gimmick. Some stores offer the treat for free if the employee fails to perform the trick.

You can credit a teenage boy in Missouri for inspiring the practice. In the 1950s, Ted Drewes Jr. ran a frozen custard stand located in St. Louis, where he sold concretes—frozen custard mixed with bits of fruit. In 1959, 14-year-old Steve Gamber made a habit of visiting Drewes's stand nearly every day and asking for a chocolate malt. Every time Drewes handed it to him, Gamber would ask for him to make it thicker.

Eventually, Gamber said, Drewes got fed up and started turning it upside down "just to shut me up." But the tradition lasted, and Drewes began turning every customer's concrete upside down before serving it. In the 1970s, Dairy Queen franchisee Sam Temperato, who owned several DQ restaurants in St. Louis, took notice of both Drewes's concretes and cheeky presentation and went to Dairy Queen executives with the proposal for the first Blizzard. (Ted Drewes, meanwhile, is still a St. Louis institution.)

8. THE GREEN TEA BLIZZARD IS THE #1 SELLER IN CHINA.

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In the U.S., the most popular Blizzard is Oreo.

9. WARREN BUFFETT LOVES DAIRY QUEEN.

Paul Morigi, Getty Images

Of course, he owns it—at least, Berkshire Hathaway does—but he really supports the product. Once, while dining at the Four Seasons in New York City, he asked staff to pick him up some DQ ice cream for dessert. Unfortunately, the city didn't have a DQ location at the time, so he had to settle for some cookies.

10. DQ SOLD A FROZEN YOGURT OPTION IN THE '90S, BUT IT DIDN'T CATCH ON.

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You may remember the Breeze, a lower-calorie Blizzard alternative that was made with frozen yogurt. It was around for about a decade before the company pulled it from the menu, saying demand was so low that the frozen yogurt would often go bad before it could be used.

11. DALLAS MAVERICKS OWNER MARK CUBAN ANGERED DAIRY QUEEN EMPLOYEES ACROSS THE NATION IN 2002.

Ronald Martinez, Getty Images

Cuban suggested that Ed Rush, the NBA's head of officiating, wasn't even capable of managing a Dairy Queen. In response, the company invited the billionaire to give it a shot himself—and he accepted their offer. Wearing a "Tony" nametag, Cuban spent two hours serving customers at a Dairy Queen in Coppell, Texas, in 2002. He had trouble perfecting the trademark "Q" swirl at the top of soft-serve cones.

12. TECHNICALLY, WHEN YOU ORDER A CONE OR CUP AT DAIRY QUEEN, YOU'RE NOT GETTING ICE CREAM.

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According to the company, "Our soft-serve does not qualify to be called ice cream. To be categorized as ice cream, the minimum butterfat content must be 10 percent, and our soft-serve has only 5 percent butterfat."

13. THE DILLY BAR WAS INVENTED IN 1955.

Jill Schmidt, Flickr // CC BY-SA 2.0

The soft-serve round coated in chocolate and finished with that signature Dairy Queen swirl was introduced to the franchise by Robert Litherland, the co-owner of a store in Moorhead, Minnesota. Employees of an ice cream distributor in Minneapolis showed up at Litherland's door to demonstrate the technique, and finished by holding up the completed bar and saying, "Now, isn't that a dilly!" The name stuck, though Litherland had one regret: "We weren't smart enough to copyright that name." Too bad it's been getting plenty of use elsewhere lately.

14. THE "MOOLATTE" ICE CREAM TREAT GENERATED SOME CONTROVERSY.

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When DQ rolled out the MooLatte frozen coffee drink in 2004, more than a few eyebrows were raised at the made-up word's similarity to the slur "mulatto." But the controversy wasn't enough to squash the product it's still around today.

15. DENNIS THE MENACE WAS THE COMPANY SPOKESTOON UNTIL 2002.

Jim, the Photographer, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

When the copyright license expired, Dairy Queen chose not to renew it. It's been speculated that company execs felt Dennis was no longer a character kids related to.

16. THERE WAS ONCE A "LITTLE MISS DAIRY QUEEN."

Courtesy of The Caldor Rainbow, Flickr

Clad in a Dutch-style cap, dress, and shoes, Little Miss Dairy Queen was featured as a 5-foot weather vane in a select few locations. Most are gone now, but see if you can spot one on your next road trip.

17. THE WORLD'S LARGEST BLIZZARD WEIGHED 8260.85 POUNDS.

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It was made in 2005 in Springfield, Massachusetts. Guinness doesn't specify the flavor, but if we had to guess, we'd say it was Oreo.

18. DAIRY QUEEN ALSO HOLDS THE RECORD FOR THE WORLD'S LARGEST ICE CREAM CAKE.

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Made of sponge cake and vanilla ice cream, the dessert was constructed in Toronto in 2011. It weighed more than 10 tons and was topped with a ridiculous amount of crushed Oreo cookies.

19. SAUDI ARABIA REALLY LOVES DAIRY QUEEN.

Win McNamee, Getty Images

It must, anyway—otherwise, Berkshire Hathaway wouldn't have opened the world's largest Dairy Queen in Riyadh. The two-level restaurant is 7500 square feet and can seat 240 customers.

20. THE BLIZZARDMOBILE WAS A THING.

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10 Things Dairy Queen Employees Want You To Know

Fast food workers are notoriously quick to spill their secrets on Reddit, and our recent deep-dive into some Dairy Queen AMAs is proof. Here's what we learned from the site's blabbermouth users.

Mastering that swirl on your ice cream cone is hard work.

"I didn't really get the curly-q down until 3 months in." &ndash Sato1515

Seriously.

"We don't let you make cones until your second or third week." &ndash Sneaky4296

They really do have to turn your Blizzard upside down.

"We flip the Blizzard to prove it's cold and thick. At the one I work at, if we do not flip it before handing it to you and we get called out on it, the Blizzard is then free. It's a trademark thing." &ndash ericsegal

There are serious consequences for accepting your Blizzard bribes.

"More than once, I was offered a $20 tip if I made a Nerds Blizzard for a guy who brought in his own Nerds. My manager threatened to fire me if I did so." &ndash Sato1515

One Blizzard is nearly impossible to flip.

"To make an employee's day hell and maybe get a free Blizzard out of it, order a Banana Split Blizzard. [&hellip] I have been able to flip one, but extremely quickly." &ndash Spectre_04

The ice cream machines don't actually hold ice cream.

"I'm pretty sure it's something called ice milk. It comes in a big plastic bag that looks like milk, and we hook it up to a machine. The machine takes the mixture and then dispenses it as soft serve." &ndash crazyad112

They're not making your chicken strips tiny on purpose.

"Sometimes chicken strips are held, and to re-warm them, we refry them for about 30 seconds, which often causes shrinkage!" &ndash crazyad112

The hot dog you just ate might be a day old.

"The BBQ beef and hot dogs were used over, and over, and over. If they weren't all used up at close, we had to save them for the opening shift to heat up in the morning." &ndash rent1

Do research on the donation boxes at the register.

"I worked at Dairy Queen, the collection box supporting children with cancer hanging out the drive-thru window was a discontinued charity, my manager pocketed all the donations." &ndash ChiefQueefer

The salads are a total rip-off.

"They recently just down-sized them while changing the bowl to make it look like the same amount. Over $5 for 3 oz. of old lettuce, cabbage, carrots and even older grilled chicken." &ndash obeyyourbrain

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15 Things You Need to Know Before Visiting Dairy Queen

If you don't have at least one childhood memory of visiting Dairy Queen for a soft-serve cone or hot fudge sundae, then you must have been living under a rock. It's a totally beloved sweets shop&mdashand for good reason. Treats like the classic Dilly bar and banana split, plus fully-loaded Blizzards, are more than enough to keep even the biggest dessert haters coming back for more. But there is a lot of history behind the doors of DQ that you definitely need to know before your next ice-cream run.

1. It all started back in 1938 with a killer recipe.

The original formula for DQ's soft-serve ice cream was created in 1938&mdashthough the first location of Dairy Queen didn't open until 1940 in Joliette, IL. The shop is still there and is now a city-designated landmark.

2. There's a story behind the Dairy Queen name.

The very first store was dubbed "Dairy Queen" because the man behind its soft-serve, Jack McCullough, said his creation was "a queen among dairy products."

3. The Blizzard wasn't invented until 1985.

It was so wildly popular that DQ sold 175 million blizzards in that first year alone. We can't say we're surprised by this&mdashafter all, we did rank the best blizzard flavors.

4. DQ has a special blizzard made for royalty.

Dairy Queen's new Royal Blizzard is loaded with sauces in its center, so it's similar to Ben and Jerry's core series pints&mdashexcept they're blended with all your favorite mix-ins like Oreo crumbles and cheesecake bites.

5. Dairy Queen often gives away free ice cream.

Keep in touch with the brand here at Delish and also on its social media accounts to jump on deals like Free Cone Day and stuff your face with soft-serve at no charge.

6. Its soft-serve is trademarked.

Well, sort of. That curly-Q atop your cone or cup is a signature DQ move and it's part of the company's trademark look. Plus, DQ's former chief branding officer Michael Keller, won't let anyone get their hands on the recipe. "[The formula] is kept in a safe deposit box and there are only a few keys to it," he told ABC.

7. The iconic Dilly Bar was invented in 1955.

The chocolate-covered treat also features that signature curl at its center, which was first introduced to the franchise by Robert Litherland, the co-owner of a store in Moorhead, MN. You can also order it with a cherry or caramel coat.

8. The most popular Blizzard flavor is Oreo.

But you probably already guessed that, huh? Because ice cream, cheesecake, and virtually every dessert on the planet is made better with Oreos. Cookies and cream forever.

The S&rsquomores BLIZZARD treat is back. This time, it&rsquos got a rival: the new @Oreo S&rsquomores BLIZZARD treat. Try both! pic.twitter.com/L6rgtpLrCh

&mdash Dairy Queen (@DairyQueen) March 29, 2016

9. Dairy Queen has locations in over 30 countries.

If you plan on traveling, look for one of more than 6,000 DQ shops across the U.S. and in Mexico, Japan, Saudi Arabia, and Canada.

10. When you order a cup or cone, you aren't really getting ice cream.

According to the company, DQ brand soft-serve does not qualify to be called ice cream: "To be categorized as ice cream, the minimum butterfat content must be 10 percent, and our soft-serve has only 5 percent butterfat."

11. The largest Blizzard ever was 22 feet tall.

In 2005, someone in Springfield, MA decided to break the record for World's Largest Blizzard. It weighed 8,224.85 pounds and stood 22 feet high.

12. No Doubt was formed at a Dairy Queen in 1986.

Lead singer Gwen Stefani and her brother, Eric, both worked at a DQ at the time. It was there they discussed forming a band with other founding member, John Spence.

13. Every Blizzard is turned upside down before it's served.

The company likes to say this is because it "celebrates thinking differently" and that "an upside-down philosophy runs deep in the DQ system." But it's kind of a marketing gimmick: If your Blizzard fails to perform the trick, stores are supposed to give you the treat on the house. What's more, if your Blizzard isn't flipped in front of you, you can get a free one on your next visit.

14. Its Ice Cream Cakes Are Made Using The Soft Serve Machine.

The most surprising part of seeing a Dairy Queen ice cream cake being made is watching employees take a cake pan right up to the soft serve machine and pour directly from it, forming the base and walls of the cake. Check out the video at the top of the story to see what happens after that.


Joseph Sohm/Shutterstock

The billionaire businessman and Dallas Mavericks owner found himself in some hot water in 2002 when he slammed Ed Rush, the NBA's head of officiating, saying he wasn't even capable of managing a Dairy Queen. So the fast-food chain reached out to Cuban with an offer to try managing a store and he accepted. He spent two hours in a Dairy Queen in Coppell, Texas, and he had trouble creating the perfect "Q" on top of the soft serve.


This is definitely our favorite fun fact. Applebee's actively pursues efforts to source animal products sustainably and has set up specific goals to reach their ethics. In the United States and Latin America, they have committed to purchasing 100% of eggs that were raised in a cage-free environment by 2025. They have also promised to purchase gestation crate-free pork by 2020.


14 things you didn't know about Cadbury chocolate

1. Cadbury were the pioneering company that first started not working on bank holidays, so you've got them to thank for that extra lie in.

2. In 1824, John Cadbury opened a grocer's shop in Birmingham and he sold cocoa and drinking chocolate, which he prepared himself using a pestle and mortar.

3.Over 250,000 Cadbury Dairy Milk Buttons are made each minute, which is equal to 15,000,000 an hour and 400,000,000 every day. That is a LOT of buttons.

4. At the Bournville factory on present day, 1.2 million Cadbury Creme Egg, 5.5 million blocks of Cadbury Dairy Milk and 1 million Wispas are made every 24 hours. WHAT. THE. HELL.

5. The 'Gorilla' advert, which features a primate drumming along to Phil Collins, has been viewed over 10 million times on various YouTube channels. It's not on Cadbury's official page, though, which is a lot of missed views.

6.Cadbury wasn't always the signature purple and gold wrapping it is today. Until 1920, it was actually pale mauve with red script.

7. The first Cadbury Easter egg was made in 1875. It was dark chocolate and had a smooth, plain surface, filled with sugar-coated chocolate drops known as 'dragees'.

8. There are 530 calories in 100g of Cadbury Dairy Milk, 240 calories in a 45g bar, and about 25 calories in a single square of choc. SO WORTH IT.

9. Creme Eggs dropped a massive £6 million in sales figures in 2015 after parent company Mondelez revealed they had sneakily changed the recipe. More about that here.

10. The first bar of milk chocolate was made in 1897, when Cadbury had lots of cocoa butter left over from making Cocoa Essence, so they used it to make bars of chocolate.

11. 350 million bars of Dairy Milk are sold every year, which is almost one million a day. We're willing to admit to approximately 4 of those.

12. ONCE UPON A TIME SPICE GIRLS CHOCOLATES EXISTED THIS IS NOT A DRILL. Look:

13. The purple colour Pantone 2685c was initially owned by Cadbury, until Nestlé took them to court over it. Despite winning the 4 year court case, they eventually lost the rights to the purple hue when Nestlé challenged the ruling in 2013.

14. Dreamy White chocolate buttons were launched before Giant Cadbury Dairy Milk Buttons. launched in 1999. The white ones were launched in 1989, whilst the giant ones were launched in 1999.


It was listed because it appeared 700 times in the 418-million word database of English words and phrases from which Collins compiles its dictionary, and as such was deemed a common word.

The explanation of the noun went was said to be the 'recipes or style of cooking of British cookery writer Delia Smith'. The dictionary also offered the follow definitions:

1. Attributed to or in the style of Delia Smith, a Delia dish 2. The 'Delia effect' occurs when millions seek out an ingredient or piece of equipment she has recommended.


10 Things You Need To Know Before Drinking Another Slurpee

You won't believe where they were originally created.

If nothing else, 7-Eleven will forever be synonymous with the Slurpee. The super-sweet frozen drink has garnered a cult following, especially during its virtually free promotions. But there's plenty you didn't know about the iconic slush that's worth a closer look.

1. It was created back in 1965.

A happy accident led to the first Slurpee. After the soda fountain at one Dairy Queen broke, the owner stashed soda in a freezer. People loved it, and he decided to build a machine specifically for mixing and freezing the combination of water, flavoring, and sugar. It's essentially a hybrid of both a soda fountain and an ice cream freezer in one. Carbon dioxide (CO2) was added to the recipe to make the drink smoother and give it that extra fizzy, fluffy effect that people are still obsessed with today.

2. There was once only two flavors.

Coke and cherry were the sole options when the Slurpee &mdash named for the "slurp" sound it makes when you sip it through a straw &mdash was first offered in stores.

3. Specialty cups are real collector's items.

Since the '70s, 7-Eleven has issued limited-edition cups emblazoned with sports stars, popular cartoon characters, comic book heroes, video games, blockbuster movies, and even rock bands.

4. Slurpee mixology is a thing.

According to market research, 41 percent of Slurpee drinkers never mix their flavors. But 37 percent say they always do, while the remaining 21 percent will mix every once in a while. But what exactly are they mixing? One of the most popular combos is Coke and a fruit flavor on top, like Wild Cherry or Piña Colada.

5. The "Suicide Slurpee" takes serious guts.

You've got to be pretty damn daring to attempt this, which involves mixing every single flavor from the row of dispensers &mdash which could range from cola to bubble gum to sour apple.

6. Some flavors can get pretty freaking weird.

Presented without comment are "Grapermelon," Banana Cream Pie, Red Licorice, "Purple S-Cream," "Slurpurita Pomegranate," and "Shrek-alicious" (a tie-in with Shrek).

7. Candy is always an option.

As if the Slurpee wasn't already sweet enough, it's been given flavor injections from some of your favorite treats &mdash like Sour Patch and Skittles.

8. Slurpees have been turned into donuts.

No, really. You can drink your Slurpee and eat it, too. The chain of convenience stores released a cake donut laced with pink sprinkles and topped with Wild Cherry icing.

9. It inspired the frozen margarita.

Dallas restaurant owner and inventor of the frozen marg machine, Mariano Martinez, cited the Slurpee as his original inspo. Taco Tuesday has never been the same.

10. You can score free slushes a few times each year.

From Name Your Price Day to Bring Your Own Cup Day, 7-Eleven offers plenty of opportunities for you to score free &mdash or enormous, or super cheap &mdash Slurpees throughout the year.

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10 Things You Didn't Know About Empire's Taraji P. Henson

I recently got the chance to watch the first half of Empire's two-hour season finale, which airs tonight. And, guys, let me tell you, the first half is jaw-on-the-floor and you-can't-help-but-scream-crazy-loud level epic. But what was even more amazing was getting to watch the show with Taraji P. Henson, who in addition to being Queen Cookie, won my vote for best television commentary ever (she once even shouted out "Lucifer!" about Lucious while we were all watching. and it was amazing.) Here's what else I learned about TV's reigning new queen:

No matter what, she's always a mom first.

"My son is 20, so he grew up in this industry with me. Even if I had 5 A.M. calls, Iɽ get up and cook him pancakes, eggs, and sausage and leave it in the microwave for him all wrapped up. The crazy thing is that my career really grew as he was growing. When I was first starting out, no one knew who I was, so that gave me time to go to all of his games and PTA meetings."

Mary J. Blige is a fan of her cooking.

"I love to cook and look for recipes all the time. I make lasagna, great collard greens, and I do an amazing Thanksgiving turkey. My signature dish is chili. I make two types: red chili and a white-bean chicken chili. Every time Mary J. Blige comes to town, she requests it. She'll say, 'Taraji, are you going to make that chili?' And when she's out of town, she'll ask me to freeze a bag and her assistant will come pick it up!"


Watch the video: TOP 10 UNTOLD TRUTHS OF DAIRY QUEEN!!!