ls.acetonemagazine.org
New recipes

Sorrel Rice Bowls with Poached Eggs

Sorrel Rice Bowls with Poached Eggs



We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.


This “put an egg on it” dream dish is a must-order menu item at Sqirl. If using kale, you may want to add more lemon juice to mimic sorrel’s tart sharpness.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups short-grain brown rice
  • 1 cup (lightly packed) sorrel or kale leaves (ribs removed, if using kale)
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon distilled white vinegar
  • 1 large watermelon radish or 2 red radishes, very thinly sliced
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice, divided
  • ½ preserved lemon, flesh removed, peel finely chopped
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh dill, plus more for serving
  • 2 oz. feta, preferably sheep’s milk, crumbled
  • Flaky sea salt (such as Maldon)

Recipe Preparation

  • Cook rice in a large pot of boiling salted water until tender, 45–50 minutes. Drain rice, return to pot, cover, and let sit 10 minutes. Spread out on a baking sheet and let cool completely.

  • Purée sorrel, oil, and 1 Tbsp. water in a food processor until smooth; season with kosher salt and pepper.

  • Meanwhile, bring 2” water to a boil in a large saucepan; reduce heat so water is at a gentle simmer and add vinegar. Crack an egg into a small bowl, then gently slide egg into water. Repeat with remaining eggs, waiting until whites are opaque before adding the next (about 30 seconds apart). Poach until whites are set and yolks are still runny, about 3 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer eggs to paper towels as they are done.

  • Toss radish with 1 Tbsp. lemon juice in a small bowl; season with kosher salt.

  • Toss rice, preserved lemon, 1 Tbsp. dill, remaining 1 Tbsp. lemon juice, and ⅓ cup sorrel purée in a medium bowl; season with kosher salt and pepper and mix in more sorrel purée, if desired.

  • Serve sorrel rice topped with poached eggs, radish, feta, hot sauce, more dill, and sea salt.

  • DO AHEAD: Rice can be cooked 2 days ahead; cover and chill. Sorrel purée can be made 2 days ahead; cover and chill. Bring rice and purée to room temperature before serving.

Recipe by Adapted from Everything I Want To Eat. Copyright ©2016 by Jessica Koslow. Published by Abrams Books.,Photos by Michael Graydon Nikole Herriott

Nutritional Content

Calories (kcal) 580 Fat (g) 24 Saturated Fat (g) 6 Cholesterol (mg) 225 Carbohydrates (g)78 Dietary Fiber (g) 6 Total Sugars (g) 1 Protein (g) 17 Sodium (mg) 340Reviews SectionThis was great! I used sorrel from the freezer, and also added some stir-fried broccoli. Also I used lime instead of lemon, because that is what was in the fridge. Could use a full semester class on how to properly poach an egg, though. I can't seem to get it right. But the rice was delicious.Anonymousalbuquerque, new mexico01/14/19

BLACK RICE SORREL BOWL

It’s not very often where I dine somewhere and feel so emotionally connected to the food. At Sqirl, the food doesn’t just remind me of my home (California) with it’s slight hippie sensibility, but feels like food you’ve been dreaming of and didn’t know you were missing.

I can’t remember the last time I was this excited for a cookbook - not just for inspiration, visually or otherwise - but for once, to actually cook from it. Crispy rice, sorrel pesto rice bowl, buckwheat financiers - I cannot get enough of Jessica’s food. It was shocking to realize the simplicity of some of these recipes. Specifically the famous sorrel pesto, which includes almost exclusively - lemon, olive oil and sorrel. Most of the recipes are remarkably uncomplicated in a way that can only be described as everything I want to eat…and cook, too.

SQIRL SORREL PESTO BLACK RICE BOWL (Gluten-free) Serves 2

  • 1 cup black rice
  • 2 watermelon radishes, thinly sliced (on mandolin)
  • 1 lemon, divided
  • Extra Virgin Olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon chopped dill, parsley, chives
  • 1/2 preserved lemon, peel finely diced
  • 1 teaspoon preserved lemon juice
  • 1-2 oz feta cheese, crumbled (opt)
  • 2 large eggs
  • Hot sauce, to serve

Sorrel Pesto:

  • 1 cup chopped sorrel, lightly packed
  • 1/2 cup chopped kale leaves, lightly packed
  • 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • Sea salt, to taste

In a large saucepan, add rice, two cups of water and a generous pinch of salt. Bring to a boil, then simmer for 25-30 minutes until rice is tender and water is absorbed. Fluff with a fork and set aside.

In a small bowl, add sliced radish, about 1/2 lemon juice, a drizzle of olive oil and a pinch of salt. Leave aside to marinate while you prepare the pesto.

To make pesto: in a blender or food processor, add sorrel, kale, 1/4 cup olive oil, 1 1/2 tablespoons of lemon juice and salt to taste. Blend until smooth.

In a large bowl, toss the rice with herbs, preserved lemon, about a teaspoon of preserved lemon juice and prepared pesto. Season with salt.

To poach eggs:

Fill a large saucepan with water and a good splash of white vinegar. Over med-high heat, let the temperature come up until you begin to see tiny bubbles around the rim.

Crack your eggs into tiny ramekins. Then gently whirlpool the water and slide in your eggs (one at a time, if you’re nervous) into the center of the whirlpool. Let the eggs sit for about 30 seconds, then slowly stir in a circle making sure the egg white wraps around the yolk. *If you are poaching two at a time, now add your second egg, repeating the process (and steering clear of your other egg)/ If your egg gets stuck on the bottom of the pan, don’t fret, use a silicon spatula to carefully remove it. If your water gets close to boiling or simmering, reduce heat. You want a still, steady heat to poach them in. Let cook, gently stirring in a circular motion, until egg whites just begin to firm (or set, gently touch the egg white to judge doneness), and aren’t translucent. Remove with a slotted spoon, draining the water, then top an egg on each serving.

Assemble your bowls: Divide rice among bowls with hot sauce, crumbled feta, marinated radish and top with a poached egg (see above). Garnish with more herbs, flaky sea salt and freshly ground pepper. Serve immediately!


Savory Rice Bowls (& How to Make Individual Eggs for a Crowd)

Earlier this year we had an incredible breakfast at Sqirl, Jessica Koslow’s beloved toast-and-rice-bowl restaurant in Silver Lake, Los Angeles. The flavors in her dishes are unexpected, bright, and fresh. I’ve been thinking about the savory bowl of rice and eggs ever since and actually thought something like it would be a beautiful addition to Christmas brunch. After all, the sweets are easy—cookies and pies and boxes of chocolates abound, cinnamon rolls and coffee cakes are sure crowd-pleasers (we’re going to include this French Toast roast) the savories can take a bit more thought if you’d like something other than a frittata to serve many.

So here’s a trick for batch-cooking soft eggs for a crowd, using Koslow’s recipe for Sorrel Rice Bowls with Poached Egg (adapted from Bon Appetit). Much of it can be prepped ahead.

For every 4 people you’ll need:

2 cups short-grain brown rice (prepared according to directions)
1 cup (lightly packed) kale leaves (ribs removed), or sorrel (Koslow’s ingredient)
¼ cup olive oil (plus extra for greasing pan)
Flaky Salt and Freshly ground black pepper
4 large eggs
1 large watermelon radish or 2 red radishes, very thinly sliced.*
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice, divided
½ preserved lemon, finely chopped (I found mine at Trader Joe’s)
1 tablespoon chopped fresh dill, plus extra for garnish
2 oz. feta, preferably sheep’s milk, crumbled
Optional: Hot sauce

*Embarrassing confession: I grabbed a beet instead of a watermelon radish at the market and didn’t realize it until I was finishing the meal. It actually didn’t matter terribly—the beet was delicious, too! But that should be a radish in those photos.

Purée kale or sorrel with olive oil and a squeeze of lemon juice. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Prep your other ingredients: Toss sliced radish with lemon juice and salt and set aside, and chop up your dill and lemon.

Mix your rice with your purée, preserved lemon, dill, salt and pepper to taste. You can prepare both ingredients in advance and store separately in the refrigerator for up to two days.

Now here’s the trick to cooking many eggs at once: use a muffin tin!

Grease your pan well and bake in a 350 oven for 10-12 minutes until just set. If they stick a little, don’t fret: the rice and garnishes will disguise any imperfections.

Serve rice topped with poached eggs, radish, feta, sprigs of dill, and sea salt. Add hot sauce if you like.

Or serve everything family style and let everyone compose their own!

It’s such a beautiful, bright addition to the table and a nice counterpoint to all the holiday sweets.

What do you like to eat on holiday mornings? Do you eat the same thing every time or do you mix it up?

This post is sponsored by the American Egg Board, with whose support I’ve been sharing some of my favorite ways to prepare eggs. Thank you so much for your support. Head over to their site to check out eggspert tips like when and why to use room temperature eggs, how to substitute various sizes of eggs, and best storing practices for eggs. And re-visit more of this year’s egg recipes—like that amazing French Toast. Share your favorite egg-based recipes with the hashtag #RecipeEggchange.


Brown Rice Porridge

Yields about 4 cups serves 4

“This is one of our OG dishes,” Koslow writes. “We opened Sqirl during ‘winter’ in California, when the temperature hovers around 65°F and people tend to want something a little warmer for breakfast. It&rsquos similar to the Danish dish risengrød, which is traditionally served with butter and cinnamon. Our kitchen crew actually loves to eat this porridge cold. My go-to is the vegan variation with granola on top, plus a friendly dollop of jam.”

Ingredients
1 cup medium-grain brown rice, preferably Kokuho Rose
4 cups whole milk
1/4 cup sugar
1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt
1/2 vanilla bean
Chopped raw hazelnuts
Your favorite jam

1. Rinse the rice in a fine-mesh sieve under cool water until the water runs clear. Transfer the rice to a large, heavy-bottomed pot. Pour in the milk and 4 cups water. Add the sugar and salt and stir to dissolve. Slice the 1/2 vanilla bean in half lengthwise and use the dull edge of your knife to scrape all the tiny black seeds into the pot. Drop in the scraped bean pod as well.

2. Bring to a boil. Watch the pot for the first few minutes you want the liquid to boil but not boil over. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the rice is soft, the porridge is thick, and most of the liquid has evaporated, 60 to 70 minutes. At first it will seem like way too much liquid for so little rice, but with time it will evaporate. As the porridge gets closer and closer to being done, you&rsquoll need to stir more often to prevent the rice from sticking to the bottom of the pot.

3. Before serving, fish out and discard the vanilla bean pod. Top each bowl of porridge with a handful of hazel­nuts and a spoonful of jam.

4. You can serve this porridge hot or cold, depending on what sounds best to you. When you chill it in the fridge, a skin will form on top. Don&rsquot be afraid of that, just mix it up. If you need to re-heat it and it&rsquos a little too thick, add a splash of milk.

Note: Do not rinse the rice the starch adds body. [For a vegan variation], use water in place of the milk. We always serve vegan brown rice porridge hot and add a splash of almond milk to it while it heats up.


Sorrel Rice Bowl

Ingredients

  • 2 Cups Kokuho Rose Rice
  • Fine Sea Salt
  • 1/4 cup plus 1 tsp EVOO
  • 1/2 cup lightly packed kale leaves (stems removed)
  • 1 cup lightly packed chopped sorrel leaves
  • 1.5 TB fresh lemon juice
  • 1 TB chopped fresh dill, plus more for serving
  • 1/2 – 1 preserved Meyer Lemon from your box: flesh removed, peel finely chopped (if your box didn’t included preserved lemons, then use a bit of lemon zest to flavor your rice bowl)
  • 1 – 2 small watermelon radishes, very thinly sliced
  • 1/8 C Hot Sauce
  • 1/3 C crumbled Feta Cheese
  • 3 poached eggs
  • Fleur de sel
  • Freshly Ground Black Pepper

Instructions

  1. Boil the rice in plenty of salted water until it’s tender. 30-45 minutes. Drain and let cool.
  2. Meanwhile, make the sorrel pesto: in a blender or food processor, combine 1/4 C of the oil, kale, sorrel and 1/2 TB of lemon juice. Blend until smooth, stopping and scraping down the sides as needed. Season with salt to taste.
  3. In a large bowl, toss the rice with the dill, preserved lemon peel (or some lemon zest), 1/2 tablespoon of the lemon juice, and the pesto. Taste and add a bit more salt, if needed.
  4. In a small bowl, toss the radish with the remaining 1/2 tablespoon of lemon juice, the remaining 1 tsp oil, and a pinch of salt. Set aside to marinate for a few minutes, until the radish is pliable and tender.
  5. To serve, divide the rice among 2-4 bowls. Spoon a line of hot sauce across the rice. Arrange a little clump of feta on one side and a rosette of the radish slices on the other side. Set a poached egg in the middle of each bowl and season it with fleur de sel and black pepper. Garnish with a tiny sprig or two of dill.
  6. MAKE IT YOURS
  7. Think of this rice bowl as a solid base for you to build upon. Don’t like poached eggs? Leave them out. Make it a Meat Lovers’ dish by adding bacon or sausage. Or go the vegan route and substitute kale for the feta and eggs. No preserved lemon ? Try using some lemon zest…

Notes

  • Not Included in Large Kitchen Box: Sea Salt, EVOO, Hot Sauce, Fleur de Sel, Ground Black Pepper
  • Not Included in Small Box and Vegetarian Box: Sea Salt, EVOO, Hot Sauce, Fleur de Sel, Ground Black Pepper, eggs

Did you make this recipe?

Share a photo and tag us @narrativefood— we can't wait to see what you've made!


Breakfast Rice Bowls with Smoked Fish

Satisfying, unfussy meals. What’s not to love?

Walmart just dropped a truckload of incredible weekend deals — save up to 80 percent!

From TVs and headphones to robot vacs and curling irons, these deals are not to be missed.

Marilyn Monroe lookalike has 11 million TikTok followers — but confidence didn't come easily

Jasmine Chiswell had to work up the courage to wear vintage clothing as her signature style.

AdPlace A Bag On Your Car Mirror When Traveling

Brilliant Car Cleaning Hacks Local Dealers Wish You Didn’t Know

'You see immediate results': Amazon is having a one-day sale on top-rated teeth whiteners —over 40 percent off

Get a whiter smile, just in time for those post-lockdown pictures!

Kate Middleton and Jill Biden meet for the first time — and they could have kept talking for hours

The pair talked about a shared passion — early childhood development — and "could have kept going for hours!"

Helena Christensen, 52, recreates swimsuit picture from 1990

"My boobs grew," the model wrote in reference to the 30 year difference.

Margaret Cho opens up about her LGBTQ identity: 'I definitely still feel like an outsider'

Margaret Cho, 52, says she often feels like she doesn’t fit into the traditional parameters of the LGBTQ community.

Ashley Graham unapologetically embraces her hairy armpits: ‘It’s my body'

The 33-year-old model is hairy and unbothered.

I'm a pet owner, and this on-sale $40 air purifier eliminated every funky smell — grab it at Amazon

The Partu HEPA air purifier has racked up over 18,000 five-star reviews from pet owners, smokers and more.

Barack Obama praises daughters Sasha and Malia: ‘They’re not just interested in making noise’

Barack Obama is praising his daughters for their participation in the Black Lives Matter protests, sharing that 19-year-old Sasha and 22-year-old Malia are "so much wiser, more sophisticated and gifted than I was at their age."


Poached Eggs Over Rice

You can use any type of wholegrain rice you like - just think non-white. There are many wonderful whole grain rice varietals out there to try - brown rice, red rice, wild rice - I used a black Japonica rice in the version pictured here. If I were sharing this with a friend or guests I might make the dressing a bit more elaborate (for example using the dressing from Otsu salad in Super Natural Cooking). As far as poaching the eggs is concerned, I've tried varying techniques over the years to achieve nicely poached eggs - recently abandoning the vinegar-water (as well as the whirlpool/ vortex technique) and instead opting for an approach more in line with the one highlighted in Michael Ruhlman's new book - utilizing a strainer to minimize flyaway whites.

1 tablespoon olive oil
1/2 onion, chopped
2 pinches of salt
pinch of crushed red pepper flakes (optional)
3/4 cup organic extra-firm tofu (optional), 1/4 inch dice
1 small clove garlic, chopped
2 - 3 cups dark leafy green, deveined and finely chopped
2 - 3 cups pre-cooked whole grain rice (brown is fine)
4 good quality eggs

Fill a wide-mouthed saucepan with 3-4 inches of water and bring to a simmer.

Separately, warm the olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in the onion, salt, and crusher red pepper flakes. Let the onions soften up a bit - a couple minutes. Stir in the tofu if you are using it - let that heat up and brown a tad. Now stir in the garlic and greens. Cook the greens for a couple minutes, until they collapse and soften up. Stir in the pre-cooked rice and saute until hot. Remove from heat, and set aside. Taste for seasoning as well.

Now back to the simmering water. You are going to use this to poach the eggs one at a time. Gently crack egg into a ramekin, carefully slip it into a mesh strainer over your sink - some of the whites will run through and strain off (if the mesh is too fine, you won't get the desired effect). This minimizes the fly-away whites you normally get. Now, carefully slide the egg back into the ramekin. Lower the ramekin down into the simmering water and let the egg slip out. Let it simmer there for a few minutes, past the point when the whites have become opaque. If you like a loose yolk, cook for less time. Remove the egg with a strainer or slotted spoon and either serve it atop some rice or set aside while you repeat the process with the remaining eggs.

Divide the rice between four bowls and serve each topped with one of the poached eggs.


Sorrel Rice Bowls with Poached Eggs - Recipes

It’s captivating to watch a craftswoman concentrating on her material, a carpenter choosing the right piece of wood, a tailor feeling the fabrics, or a chef taking about a new recipe and picking the right ingredients. Jessica Koslow is a craftswoman, but she’s equally an artist gifted with a huge sense for freedom and creativity and this shines through every single one of her creations. She’s also a scientist who critically re-thinks all the single components of a dish until the final result is complete, until the textures and flavors feel aligned, until it looks deliciously tempting. This woman is so much, which makes her one of the leading figures of a new powerful movement of female chefs in California, but also in the rest of the world.

Sqirl is located just around the corner from Vermont Avenue that leads straight to Griffith Park, the restaurant is almost unspectacular, pleasantly unpretentious and casual, but the dishes that come out of the kitchen can easily compete with Michelin starred restaurants. The open kitchen works smoothly, peacefully, every chef seems to deeply enjoy the part they have in the Sqirl universe, it’s a bit like friends cooking, just more precise. Like the Sorrel Pesto Rice, inspired by Pierre Troisgros, the father of the nouvelle cuisine movement, that blew my mind: Kokuho rose brown rice, sorrel pesto, preserved meyer lemon, lacto-fermented hot sauce, watermelon radish, French sheep feta, and a perfectly poached egg spreading its shiny liquid yolk all over this vibrant composition. And the Sqirl Chicken Salad with Marin Sun chicken, bok choy, dehydrated citrus and root vegetables, grated carrots, and black garlic vinaigrette balances crunch and tenderness, sweetness and bitterness, it’s a dish that excites and satisfies.

Jessica comes across as very relaxed, she laughs a lot, but when you ask her a question she pauses and takes her time to think, to answer with the same precision you can find in her dishes, in the same way that she designed her restaurant, and how she put her first cookbook together, Everything I Want to Eat: Sqirl and the New California Cooking. There is a vision that only she can see that seems to guide her in the right direction. She used to be a competitive figure skater which explains her discipline and dedication, and when she stopped at 19, she channeled her obsession into something new: food.

From then on it was all about cooking, eating, and tasting. She was fascinated by the moment when you put the first bite into your mouth and you’re overwhelmed. That’s the experience she wants to create at her restaurant and she knows that she only has this first second to reach and convince her guests’ taste buds. She and her team are gifted with outstanding produce, which she honors in her creations and that she receives from farmers who are friends and part of her community. This is the foundation of her work: “Raw produce defines a season, it’s the passing of times and in California, thankfully, it’s such a delicious marker of time. Our produce is an exciting time stamp and a building block from there.” The Sqirl world is about dishes that feel familiar and unfamiliar at the same time, they create comfort and inquisitiveness, it’s about different layers and textures, using the raw natural produce, but also playing with it, fermenting, pickling, or dehydrating it. As exciting as it is to eat this woman’s food, it’s a pure pleasure listing to her words.

Sqirl is a breakfast and lunch spot only, but in 2018 Jessica will open a dinner place for all her begging, hungry fans, called Tel – keep your eyes and ears open!

In the next months, I’ll share many new Meet In Your Kitchen features with you that took me to California, Italy, France, and Japan. Thanks to Zwilling for sponsoring these features for our culinary trip around the world!

Jessica Koslow’s Sorrel Pesto Rice

3 cups (600 g) medium-grain brown rice, preferably Kokuho Rose
Fine sea salt
½ cup plus 2 teaspoons (130 ml) extra-virgin olive oil
1 cup (25 g) lightly packed kale leaves (stems removed)
2 cups (50 g) lightly packed chopped sorrel leaves
3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill, plus more for serving
1 Preserved Meyer Lemon, flesh removed, peel finely chopped
2-4 small watermelon radishes, very thinly sliced
¼ cup (60 ml) Fermented Jalapeño Hot Sauce
¾ cup (85 g) crumbled sheep’s-milk feta

6 poached eggs
Fleur de sel
Freshly ground black pepper

Boil the rice in plenty of salted water until it’s tender, 30 to 45 minutes. Drain and let cool.
Meanwhile, make the sorrel pesto: In a blender or food processor, combine ½ cup (120 ml) of the oil, kale, sorrel, and 1 tablespoon of the lemon juice. Blend until smooth, stopping and scraping down the sides as needed. Season with salt to taste.

In a large bowl, toss the rice with the dill, preserved lemon peel, 1 table­spoon of the lemon juice, and the pesto. Taste and add a bit more salt, if needed.

In a small bowl, toss the radish with the remaining 1 tablespoon lemon juice, the remaining 2 teaspoons oil, and a pinch of salt. Set aside to marinate for a few minutes, until the radish is pliable and tender.

To serve, divide the rice among six bowls. Spoon a line of hot sauce across the rice. Arrange a little clump of feta on one side and a rosette of radish slices on the other side. Set a poached egg in the mid­dle of each bowl and season it with fleur de sel and black pepper. Gar­nish with a tiny sprig or two of dill.

Watch my interview with Jessica in LA in September 2017:


Sweet sorrel tart

This delicious pud does require a hefty bunch of sorrel, but the results are delicious: sorrel's lemony tang delicately cuts the sweet, soft-set custard. Serves eight to 10.

About 300g sorrel
Knob of butter, about 15g
2 large eggs, plus 2 egg yolks
200ml double cream
200ml whole milk
75g icing sugar
50g raisins

For the sweet shortcrust pastry
200g plain flour
35g icing sugar
Pinch of salt
125g cold, unsalted butter, cut into cubes
1 large egg yolk
About 75ml cold milk (or water)

Make the pastry first. Put the flour, sugar and salt in a food processor and blitz briefly to combine (or sieve into a bowl). Add the butter and blitz (or rub in with your fingertips) until the mixture resembles breadcrumbs. Add the egg yolk, and enough milk or water to bring it together into large clumps. Tip out on to a lightly floured surface and knead gently into a ball. Wrap in clingfilm and chill for 30 minutes.

Heat the oven to 190C/375F/gas mark 5 and put a baking sheet inside. Roll out the pastry to fit a 24cm tart tin. Line the tin with the pastry, leaving the excess hanging over the edge. Prick all over with a fork and chill for 10 minutes more.

Line the pastry with greaseproof paper or foil, making sure the edges are covered, fill with baking beans or uncooked lentils or rice, and bake blind for 15 minutes. Remove the beans and paper, and cook for another five minutes, or until the pastry looks cooked but not browned. Leave to cool, then trim off the rough edges. Reduce the oven to 180C/350F/gas mark 4.

Remove any tough stalks from the sorrel. Wash the leaves, dry thoroughly and shred finely.

Heat half the butter in a large frying pan over a medium-low heat. Add half the sorrel and cook for a few minutes, stirring often, until collapsed and drastically reduced in volume. Transfer to a colander to cool. Repeat with the remaining sorrel. When cool, squeeze out the excess moisture with your hands.

In a wide bowl, whisk together the eggs, egg yolks, cream and milk. Sift in the icing sugar, whisk to dissolve, then stir in the raisins and wilted sorrel. Pour carefully into the prepared pastry case, using a fork to distribute the sorrel and raisins evenly. Bake for about 40 minutes, or until set and just golden. Leave to cool, and serve warm or at room temperature.


Sorrel Rice Bowls with Poached Eggs - Recipes

Food52 asked me about my approach to soups. Not just any soups, but big-flavor, clean-out-the-fridge soups to cure the winter blues. I love them now, but that wasn’t always the case. We’re like friends that had to learn to love each other. So I shared our bumpy love story, my basic soup formula, and three soup recipes from my new book, 365, on food52.com. Converted and convinced that a soup can be one of the best things to find on your dining table after a long day of work, I also decided to share my article on these pages here (and you can find two of the recipes from 365 below):

I have a new habit, recently, I often have soup for lunch, which is actually my breakfast as I only have green tea with lemon in the morning. My relationship with liquid foods wasn’t always so harmonic. Soups and stews are very popular in Germany, thick lentil, pea, or potato soup enriched with smoked sausage (Knackwurst or Knacker) is a German winter classic. As a child, I ate it, but I wasn’t particularly fond of it. There was something missing, or maybe I just wasn’t ready yet. Then the eighties came, the Nouvelle Cuisine reached home kitchens and all of a sudden soups where always puréed and as bright as candy: yellow squash, purple beet, squeaking green pea pod. Shallow bowls filled with colorful compositions, smooth and shiny, conquered the menus but unfortunately not my palate. Despite their vibrancy, they didn’t excite me. This is essential to me, and my taste buds – I want, I need food to excite me. So I took a break of many, many years until I found the kind of soup that I like.

Fast-forward to today and it has become a constant in my weekly culinary routine. My basic soup formula is very simple:
1. Canned legumes and dried lentils that don’t need to soak overnight. I always have a vast collection of cans filled with butter beans, cannellini, borlotti (cranberry) and kidney beans on my pantry shelves, and bags of black beluga lentils, dark green French Puy lentils, and yellow and red lentils. Legumes make a soup rich and wholesome, they add heartiness and a nutty touch. It’s what turns a light soup into a proper meal.
2. Cleaning out the vegetable drawer. This drawer is a treasure box that needs to be emptied once in a while. Leafy vegetables, kale, chard, and spinach that start to wilt, sturdy roots like potatoes, parsnip, and beets that lie forgotten, the whole range of winter and summer squash, fresh beans, peas, and tomatoes. Every season has its produce that’s just waiting to crown a soup.
3. Using homemade or quality store-bought broth. My mother taught me to always cook my own broth, with leftover vegetables, chicken, duck, and beef bones, with fresh herbs and whole spices like allspice, peppercorns, and juniper berries. And a bay leaf, always a bay leaf. I then freeze it in 4-cup portions to have my tasty broth right at hand whenever I need it. I never use instant broth as I find it adds an artificial flavor. Broth is the base of a soup, it adds its taste to all the other ingredients and therefore deserves utmost attention.

Soups can easily follow the seasons and the cook’s mood. I want to throw them together spontaneously, quickly, without too much planning or overthinking. A quick look in the pantry and fridge and my mind starts playing. A soup is a simple, a frugal dish, but that doesn’t mean it can’t be exciting. Playing with flavors is a boundless game, playing with textures is at least as rewarding. And varying toppings allows the cook to serve a soup repeatedly without anyone noticing. Crunchy bacon cubes or dukkah, a dollop of velvety mascarpone or ricotta, a fried or poached egg, or a crumbled hardboiled egg, fried herbs like sage or rosemary, or roasted fruit like grapes, apple, pear, or apricot.

In my new book, 365: A Year of Everyday Cooking & Baking, I share a recipe for each day of the year, following the seasons and also the rhythm of the week, from Monday to Sunday, from quick and simple weekday dishes to luscious – and more time-consuming – roasts, stews, and cakes on the weekend. Soups are a constant treat in this rhythm, especially during the colder part of the year. There’s a cozy kale and borlotti bean soup for example, cooked in a flavorful duck broth (recipe from 365 below and on food52.com) – a clear vegetable broth works just as well – and it’s the perfect cure for winter blues. It’s crowned with a poached egg and when you cut through the yolk and let it run into the broth, it adds a creaminess that’s even better than cream as an added bonus: it only takes twenty minutes for dinner to be ready.

A golden squash, parsnip, and sweet potato soup – basically the tasty finds of a fridge clean out – could be kept chunky but with a nod to the good old Nouvelle Cuisine, I purée it and also go for a more extravagant topping that makes this recipe fit for a Christmas table. Red grapes roasted with woody rosemary until soft and shriveled, and a dollop of whipped orange mascarpone turn this dish into a festive stunner (recipe from 365 on food52.com). However, crunchy bacon bites would make it even heartier and also quite appealing.

One of my favorite soups is the minestrone because there are no rules and limitations. Every vegetable, every combination that the cook finds fitting, works. For my green minestrone, I use green beans, peas (which I always have in my freezer), and zucchini, but that’s not set in stone, and add tiny meatballs refined with lime and arugula. It gives it a fresh citrusy note, similar to lemongrass. This is the speediest of all weekday soups. Once the meatballs are mixed and shaped, the entire soup and meat only need to cook for about 5 minutes (recipe below).

So what changed my mind, what made me fall in love with soups after so many years of skepticism? First, the taste, I had to find combinations that excite me, but then there’s something else. Sitting in front of a bowl of steaming soup is one of the coziest things I can think of. It makes me feel good while I eat it and this feeling stays. A soup is a friend of my mind and my body.

Kale and Borlotti Bean Soup with Poached Eggs

from ‘365 – A Year of Everyday Cooking & Baking’ (Prestel, 2019)

  • Olive oil
  • 1 medium onion, cut into quarters
  • 2 large cloves garlic, cut in half
  • 7 ounces (200 g) trimmed kale leaves, cut into strips
  • 5¼ cups (1.25 liters) homemade or quality store-bought duck, chicken, or vegetable broth, hot
  • 1 small bunch fresh thyme
  • 1 medium sprig fresh rosemary
  • 1 large bay leaf
  • Fine sea salt
  • Finely ground pepper
  • 1¼ cups (250 g) drained and rinsed canned borlotti (cranberry) or pinto beans

For the soup, in a large pot, heat a splash of olive oil over medium heat and sauté the onion and garlic, stirring, for a few minutes or until golden and soft. Add the kale, stir, and cook for 1 minute then add the hot broth, thyme, rosemary, and bay leaf. Season to taste with salt and finely ground pepper, reduce the heat, and simmer for 20 minutes or until the kale is tender. Remove and discard the herbs then add the borlotti beans and cook for 1 minute. Season to taste with salt and finely ground pepper and keep warm.

For the topping, bring a small saucepan of salted water to a low simmer. Crack 1 egg into a small bowl. Hold a large spoon just over the surface of the water and gently pour the egg onto the spoon. Lower the spoon into the water and hold until the egg white starts to turn white then use a tablespoon to gently scoop the egg off the large spoon. Poach the egg for 3 minutes. Using a slotted ladle or spoon, transfer the egg to a plate. Poach the remaining eggs the same way, adjusting the heat as needed to maintain a low simmer. It’s best to poach 1 egg at a time, but you can cook 2 at once.

Divide the soup among bowls, place 1 to 2 eggs in the middle of each bowl, and sprinkle with a little coarsely ground pepper. Cut the tops of the eggs with a sharp knife and serve immediately.

Green Minestrone With Lime-Arugula Meatballs

from ‘365 – A Year of Everyday Cooking & Baking’ (Prestel, 2019)

  • 14 ounces (400g) ground beef
  • 2 large cloves garlic, crushed, plus 1 large clove garlic, cut in half
  • 2 ounces ounces (60g) arugula leaves, finely chopped
  • 1 teaspoon (heaping) freshly grated lime zest
  • Fine sea salt
  • Finely ground pepper
  • Extra-virgin olive oil
  • 3 /4 pound (340g) trimmed mixed green vegetables (such as green beans, frozen peas, zucchini, Brussels sprouts, broccoli, or kale, cut into bite-size pieces if necessary)
  • 4 1 /4 cups (1 liter) homemade or quality store-bought vegetable broth, hot
  • 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lime juice
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 spring onion (green part only), thinly sliced

Combine the ground beef, crushed garlic, arugula, lime zest, 1 teaspoon of salt, and a generous amount of pepper in a large bowl and mix with your hands until well combined. Form the mixture into 38 roughly 1-inch (2.5 cm) meatballs.

Heat a splash of olive oil in a large pot over medium heat. Add the garlic and sauté for 1 minute. Add a little more oil and the vegetables and sauté, stirring, for 1 minute. Add the hot vegetable broth, lime juice, and bay leaf, season to taste with salt and pepper, and bring to a boil. Add the meatballs then reduce the heat, cover, and simmer gently for 4 to 6 minutes or until the meatballs are just cooked through and the vegetables are tender. Season to taste with salt, pepper, and additional lime juice.

Divide the soup among deep bowls, sprinkle with the spring onion, and serve immediately.

February 3, 2018

Meet In Your Kitchen | Jessica Koslow’s Sqirl in LA & the Magic of Sorrel Pesto Rice

It’s captivating to watch a craftswoman concentrating on her material, a carpenter choosing the right piece of wood, a tailor feeling the fabrics, or a chef taking about a new recipe and picking the right ingredients. Jessica Koslow is a craftswoman, but she’s equally an artist gifted with a huge sense for freedom and creativity and this shines through every single one of her creations. She’s also a scientist who critically re-thinks all the single components of a dish until the final result is complete, until the textures and flavors feel aligned, until it looks deliciously tempting. This woman is so much, which makes her one of the leading figures of a new powerful movement of female chefs in California, but also in the rest of the world.

Sqirl is located just around the corner from Vermont Avenue that leads straight to Griffith Park, the restaurant is almost unspectacular, pleasantly unpretentious and casual, but the dishes that come out of the kitchen can easily compete with Michelin starred restaurants. The open kitchen works smoothly, peacefully, every chef seems to deeply enjoy the part they have in the Sqirl universe, it’s a bit like friends cooking, just more precise. Like the Sorrel Pesto Rice, inspired by Pierre Troisgros, the father of the nouvelle cuisine movement, that blew my mind: Kokuho rose brown rice, sorrel pesto, preserved meyer lemon, lacto-fermented hot sauce, watermelon radish, French sheep feta, and a perfectly poached egg spreading its shiny liquid yolk all over this vibrant composition. And the Sqirl Chicken Salad with Marin Sun chicken, bok choy, dehydrated citrus and root vegetables, grated carrots, and black garlic vinaigrette balances crunch and tenderness, sweetness and bitterness, it’s a dish that excites and satisfies.

Jessica comes across as very relaxed, she laughs a lot, but when you ask her a question she pauses and takes her time to think, to answer with the same precision you can find in her dishes, in the same way that she designed her restaurant, and how she put her first cookbook together, Everything I Want to Eat: Sqirl and the New California Cooking. There is a vision that only she can see that seems to guide her in the right direction. She used to be a competitive figure skater which explains her discipline and dedication, and when she stopped at 19, she channeled her obsession into something new: food.

From then on it was all about cooking, eating, and tasting. She was fascinated by the moment when you put the first bite into your mouth and you’re overwhelmed. That’s the experience she wants to create at her restaurant and she knows that she only has this first second to reach and convince her guests’ taste buds. She and her team are gifted with outstanding produce, which she honors in her creations and that she receives from farmers who are friends and part of her community. This is the foundation of her work: “Raw produce defines a season, it’s the passing of times and in California, thankfully, it’s such a delicious marker of time. Our produce is an exciting time stamp and a building block from there.” The Sqirl world is about dishes that feel familiar and unfamiliar at the same time, they create comfort and inquisitiveness, it’s about different layers and textures, using the raw natural produce, but also playing with it, fermenting, pickling, or dehydrating it. As exciting as it is to eat this woman’s food, it’s a pure pleasure listing to her words.

Sqirl is a breakfast and lunch spot only, but in 2018 Jessica will open a dinner place for all her begging, hungry fans, called Tel – keep your eyes and ears open!

In the next months, I’ll share many new Meet In Your Kitchen features with you that took me to California, Italy, France, and Japan. Thanks to Zwilling for sponsoring these features for our culinary trip around the world!

Jessica Koslow’s Sorrel Pesto Rice

3 cups (600 g) medium-grain brown rice, preferably Kokuho Rose
Fine sea salt
½ cup plus 2 teaspoons (130 ml) extra-virgin olive oil
1 cup (25 g) lightly packed kale leaves (stems removed)
2 cups (50 g) lightly packed chopped sorrel leaves
3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill, plus more for serving
1 Preserved Meyer Lemon, flesh removed, peel finely chopped
2-4 small watermelon radishes, very thinly sliced
¼ cup (60 ml) Fermented Jalapeño Hot Sauce
¾ cup (85 g) crumbled sheep’s-milk feta

6 poached eggs
Fleur de sel
Freshly ground black pepper

Boil the rice in plenty of salted water until it’s tender, 30 to 45 minutes. Drain and let cool.
Meanwhile, make the sorrel pesto: In a blender or food processor, combine ½ cup (120 ml) of the oil, kale, sorrel, and 1 tablespoon of the lemon juice. Blend until smooth, stopping and scraping down the sides as needed. Season with salt to taste.

In a large bowl, toss the rice with the dill, preserved lemon peel, 1 table­spoon of the lemon juice, and the pesto. Taste and add a bit more salt, if needed.

In a small bowl, toss the radish with the remaining 1 tablespoon lemon juice, the remaining 2 teaspoons oil, and a pinch of salt. Set aside to marinate for a few minutes, until the radish is pliable and tender.

To serve, divide the rice among six bowls. Spoon a line of hot sauce across the rice. Arrange a little clump of feta on one side and a rosette of radish slices on the other side. Set a poached egg in the mid­dle of each bowl and season it with fleur de sel and black pepper. Gar­nish with a tiny sprig or two of dill.

Watch my interview with Jessica in LA in September 2017:

Thank you, Jessica!

December 2, 2015

Sweet Potato, Bacon and Poached Egg Sandwich

At the moment I’m living, literally, next to a tree – our absolutely beautiful Christmas tree. It’s perfect this year. Lush and green, the branches thick and densely packed with needles, the straight tip rising close to the high ceiling of our living room. I’m in love with this tree. I decorated it straight after it entered our flat Saturday evening and we clinked mugs full of hot mulled wine to celebrate its arrival immediately. I moved my working space to the dining table, which is right opposite this beauty, and I have problems keeping my eyes on the screen of my laptop. In December, I feel like a distracted little child, all this glitter and sparkling, Christmas ornaments and cookie boxes – how are you supposed to keep your mind focused on anything else?

However, there was something that caught my attention: a wintery sandwich lusciously stuffed with fried sweet potatoes – not as crisp as normal potatoes but they make up for it with sweetness and flavour – salty bacon, poached egg and a little chopped rosemary made it complete. The composition is so hearty that I went for a dark bun sprinkled with linseed, sunflower and sesame seeds. It’s a keeper.

Sweet Potato, Bacon and Poached Egg Sandwich

olive oil
sweet potato, peeled and thinly sliced (less than 1/2cm / 1/4″-thick), about 200g / 7 ounces
fine sea salt
pepper, crushed in a mortar
bacon 3 slices
organic eggs 2
whole wheat buns, cut in half, 2
fresh rosemary needles, chopped, a small handful

In a large, heavy pan, heat a splash of olive oil and fry the raw sweet potato slices on medium-high heat for a few minutes on both sides until golden brown and soft. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Heat a little olive oil in a heavy pan and cook the bacon on medium-high heat for a few minutes until golden brown and crisp, set the pan with the bacon aside.

For the poached eggs, bring a medium saucepan of salted water to a boil and reduce the heat to a low simmer. Crack 1 egg into a small bowl. Hold a large spoon just over the surface of the simmering water and gently pour the egg onto the spoon. Lower the spoon into the water and hold for 3 minutes—use a second spoon to put the egg back into place if it slips. Lift up the spoon, let the excess water drip off, and carefully place the egg on a plate—you may have to gently scoop it off the spoon. Poach the remaining egg the same way, adjusting the heat as needed to maintain a low simmer. It’s best to poach 1 egg at a time, but you can cook 2 at once. Once the first egg cooks on the spoon for 1 ½ minutes, let it float in the water— mind that it doesn’t stick to the bottom of the pan—and poach the second egg on a spoon. Take both eggs out once they’ve cooked for 3 minutes each.

Brush the bottom bun with the frying juices from the bacon, spread a few sweet potato slices on it and lay half the bacon on top. Finish it off with a poached egg, chopped rosemary and crushed pepper. Season with salt to taste (if necessary) and enjoy.

February 11, 2015

Poached Egg, Grilled Aubergine and Crisp Bacon Sandwich

Excitement in the kitchen! I made my first poached egg and it worked out perfectly. After a quick introduction to the art of egg poaching on Food52 I felt ready to give this challenge a try. To my surprise, it was much easier than I had expected so I could take my time and focus on the other ingredients for this week’s sandwich, grilled aubergine and crisp bacon.

My inspiration came from the great Sabih sandwich. I thought about it in the past couple days, how it combines all that lusciousness between two slices of bread, rich hummus, grilled aubergine and a boiled egg merged to true deliciousness. It could easily be too much but somehow this Middle Eastern sandwich classic does it just right. The egg and the eggplant are a great duo, they complement each other perfectly, so I used this idea but added a new flavour, salty bacon. I packed everything in between a large baguette bun and finished it off with some crunchy parsley leaves. I should warn you, this is more than a snack, it’s a proper meal, but anything smaller wouldn’t have worked, this sandwich has the same addictive quality as the scrumptious Sabih!

Poached Egg, Grilled Aubergine and Bacon Sandwich

For 2 large sandwiches you need

large, crunchy baguette buns, cut in half, 2
aubergine, cut into 1/2cm / 1/4″ slices, 1
breakfast bacon 6 slices
eggs 2-4
olive oil
coarse sea salt and pepper
fresh parsley leaves, a small handful

Brush the aubergine slices with olive oil on both sides, season with salt and pepper and put them under the grill for about 6-7 minutes on each side. Watch them as they should be golden, partly brown, but not burned. Take them out of the oven and put the slices on top of each other on a plate, that will keep them moist.

Heat a little olive oil in a pan and fry the bacon for a few minutes on each side on medium heat until golden brown and crisp. Lay them on kitchen paper to remove excess fat.

Put 2-3 slices of grilled aubergine on the bottom side of each bun and lay 2 -3 slices of bacon on top.

In a sauce pan, bring water to the boil, add some salt and turn down the temperature, it should be simmering, not bubbling! Crack an egg open and put it into a small bowl. Put a large spoon (the largest you have) on the surface of the simmering water and gently pour the egg onto the spoon. Hold the spoon with the egg in the water and put the egg back into place with a second tablespoon if it slips off the spoon (I had to do this a couple times). It needs around 3 minutes. When the egg is done, take the spoon out, let the excess water drip off and carefully scrape the poached egg onto the fried bacon with a second spoon. Sprinkle with parsley, close the bun and enjoy!

It’s best to poach one egg at a time but if you are impatient, you can cook two at once. In that case, let the first egg float in the water after cooking it on the spoon for 1 1/2 minutes (mind that it doesn’t stick to the bottom when you let it float). Poach the second egg on the spoon and take both eggs out after they have cooked for 3 minutes each.


Watch the video: Σπαράγγια με Αβγά Ποσέ και Σάλτσα Hollandaise Επ. 47. Kitchen Lab TV. Άκης Πετρετζίκης