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‘Wine Party’ T-Shirt Almost Prevented a Georgia Woman From Voting

‘Wine Party’ T-Shirt Almost Prevented a Georgia Woman From Voting


We could all use a glass of wine after this election

Although a lot of media outlets predicted Hillary Clinton’s victory, Donald Trump will be the nation’s 45th president.

Voter Joanna Chesley was stopped from entering a Forsyth County, Georgia, polling station at 7:30 a.m. until she turned her shirt inside out. Her ironic T-shirt featured a ballot with a box checked for “wine party.”

Chesley, a cafeteria worker in Forsyth County’s school system, told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution that a polling station volunteer would not let her enter under state laws that prohibit voters from promoting a candidate or party within 250 feet of any voter building and 25 feet from any voter in line.

"I can't believe I go to cast my vote for presidency of this country and my First Amendment rights are violated at the polls," Chesley said.

According to WXIA-TV / 11Alive, the volunteer saw that there wasn’t a candidate’s name on the shirt, but Chesley was still escorted to the bathroom to turn her shirt inside out. Chesley said her intention was not to intimidate other voters.

"This election has everyone on edge," she said. "It was meant to make people laugh and relax."


Trump’s Blue Line Could Breach Biden’s Blue Wall

President Trump challenged Joe Biden in the first debate to name one police endorsement he’d received. Mr. Biden couldn’t—virtually all police organizations have endorsed Mr. Trump. Police groups are endorsing Republicans at every level, many for the first time and by overwhelming votes.

The nation’s largest police organization, with 355,000 members, is the Fraternal Order of Police. Patrick Yoes, the national group’s president, tells me every officer in the FOP has a vote. The process starts with officers voting at 2,100 local lodges, each of which votes at the state level. Then, at the national level, the states each cast a vote. This year the national vote was unanimous for Mr. Trump. Also endorsing Mr. Trump are the National Association of Police Organizations, with around 241,000 members, the International Union of Police Associations (100,000), and the Police Benevolent Association of New York City (24,000), the largest big-city police union—its first-ever presidential endorsement.

An exception is the National Association of Black Law Enforcement Officers, which has about 9,000 members out of the nation’s more than 100,000 black police officers. The group has objected to the Trump endorsements, though as a nonprofit it can’t issue endorsements itself.

In this year’s 35 U.S. Senate and 11 gubernatorial races, I’ve found only three Democrats receiving major police endorsements, including two whose GOP opponents won endorsements from other police groups.

How this happened is no mystery. “In 8 minutes 46 seconds, we all went from public servants to public enemies,” Mr. Yoes says, a reference to the George Floyd video. Democrats have sided with Black Lives Matter.


Trump’s Blue Line Could Breach Biden’s Blue Wall

President Trump challenged Joe Biden in the first debate to name one police endorsement he’d received. Mr. Biden couldn’t—virtually all police organizations have endorsed Mr. Trump. Police groups are endorsing Republicans at every level, many for the first time and by overwhelming votes.

The nation’s largest police organization, with 355,000 members, is the Fraternal Order of Police. Patrick Yoes, the national group’s president, tells me every officer in the FOP has a vote. The process starts with officers voting at 2,100 local lodges, each of which votes at the state level. Then, at the national level, the states each cast a vote. This year the national vote was unanimous for Mr. Trump. Also endorsing Mr. Trump are the National Association of Police Organizations, with around 241,000 members, the International Union of Police Associations (100,000), and the Police Benevolent Association of New York City (24,000), the largest big-city police union—its first-ever presidential endorsement.

An exception is the National Association of Black Law Enforcement Officers, which has about 9,000 members out of the nation’s more than 100,000 black police officers. The group has objected to the Trump endorsements, though as a nonprofit it can’t issue endorsements itself.

In this year’s 35 U.S. Senate and 11 gubernatorial races, I’ve found only three Democrats receiving major police endorsements, including two whose GOP opponents won endorsements from other police groups.

How this happened is no mystery. “In 8 minutes 46 seconds, we all went from public servants to public enemies,” Mr. Yoes says, a reference to the George Floyd video. Democrats have sided with Black Lives Matter.


Trump’s Blue Line Could Breach Biden’s Blue Wall

President Trump challenged Joe Biden in the first debate to name one police endorsement he’d received. Mr. Biden couldn’t—virtually all police organizations have endorsed Mr. Trump. Police groups are endorsing Republicans at every level, many for the first time and by overwhelming votes.

The nation’s largest police organization, with 355,000 members, is the Fraternal Order of Police. Patrick Yoes, the national group’s president, tells me every officer in the FOP has a vote. The process starts with officers voting at 2,100 local lodges, each of which votes at the state level. Then, at the national level, the states each cast a vote. This year the national vote was unanimous for Mr. Trump. Also endorsing Mr. Trump are the National Association of Police Organizations, with around 241,000 members, the International Union of Police Associations (100,000), and the Police Benevolent Association of New York City (24,000), the largest big-city police union—its first-ever presidential endorsement.

An exception is the National Association of Black Law Enforcement Officers, which has about 9,000 members out of the nation’s more than 100,000 black police officers. The group has objected to the Trump endorsements, though as a nonprofit it can’t issue endorsements itself.

In this year’s 35 U.S. Senate and 11 gubernatorial races, I’ve found only three Democrats receiving major police endorsements, including two whose GOP opponents won endorsements from other police groups.

How this happened is no mystery. “In 8 minutes 46 seconds, we all went from public servants to public enemies,” Mr. Yoes says, a reference to the George Floyd video. Democrats have sided with Black Lives Matter.


Trump’s Blue Line Could Breach Biden’s Blue Wall

President Trump challenged Joe Biden in the first debate to name one police endorsement he’d received. Mr. Biden couldn’t—virtually all police organizations have endorsed Mr. Trump. Police groups are endorsing Republicans at every level, many for the first time and by overwhelming votes.

The nation’s largest police organization, with 355,000 members, is the Fraternal Order of Police. Patrick Yoes, the national group’s president, tells me every officer in the FOP has a vote. The process starts with officers voting at 2,100 local lodges, each of which votes at the state level. Then, at the national level, the states each cast a vote. This year the national vote was unanimous for Mr. Trump. Also endorsing Mr. Trump are the National Association of Police Organizations, with around 241,000 members, the International Union of Police Associations (100,000), and the Police Benevolent Association of New York City (24,000), the largest big-city police union—its first-ever presidential endorsement.

An exception is the National Association of Black Law Enforcement Officers, which has about 9,000 members out of the nation’s more than 100,000 black police officers. The group has objected to the Trump endorsements, though as a nonprofit it can’t issue endorsements itself.

In this year’s 35 U.S. Senate and 11 gubernatorial races, I’ve found only three Democrats receiving major police endorsements, including two whose GOP opponents won endorsements from other police groups.

How this happened is no mystery. “In 8 minutes 46 seconds, we all went from public servants to public enemies,” Mr. Yoes says, a reference to the George Floyd video. Democrats have sided with Black Lives Matter.


Trump’s Blue Line Could Breach Biden’s Blue Wall

President Trump challenged Joe Biden in the first debate to name one police endorsement he’d received. Mr. Biden couldn’t—virtually all police organizations have endorsed Mr. Trump. Police groups are endorsing Republicans at every level, many for the first time and by overwhelming votes.

The nation’s largest police organization, with 355,000 members, is the Fraternal Order of Police. Patrick Yoes, the national group’s president, tells me every officer in the FOP has a vote. The process starts with officers voting at 2,100 local lodges, each of which votes at the state level. Then, at the national level, the states each cast a vote. This year the national vote was unanimous for Mr. Trump. Also endorsing Mr. Trump are the National Association of Police Organizations, with around 241,000 members, the International Union of Police Associations (100,000), and the Police Benevolent Association of New York City (24,000), the largest big-city police union—its first-ever presidential endorsement.

An exception is the National Association of Black Law Enforcement Officers, which has about 9,000 members out of the nation’s more than 100,000 black police officers. The group has objected to the Trump endorsements, though as a nonprofit it can’t issue endorsements itself.

In this year’s 35 U.S. Senate and 11 gubernatorial races, I’ve found only three Democrats receiving major police endorsements, including two whose GOP opponents won endorsements from other police groups.

How this happened is no mystery. “In 8 minutes 46 seconds, we all went from public servants to public enemies,” Mr. Yoes says, a reference to the George Floyd video. Democrats have sided with Black Lives Matter.


Trump’s Blue Line Could Breach Biden’s Blue Wall

President Trump challenged Joe Biden in the first debate to name one police endorsement he’d received. Mr. Biden couldn’t—virtually all police organizations have endorsed Mr. Trump. Police groups are endorsing Republicans at every level, many for the first time and by overwhelming votes.

The nation’s largest police organization, with 355,000 members, is the Fraternal Order of Police. Patrick Yoes, the national group’s president, tells me every officer in the FOP has a vote. The process starts with officers voting at 2,100 local lodges, each of which votes at the state level. Then, at the national level, the states each cast a vote. This year the national vote was unanimous for Mr. Trump. Also endorsing Mr. Trump are the National Association of Police Organizations, with around 241,000 members, the International Union of Police Associations (100,000), and the Police Benevolent Association of New York City (24,000), the largest big-city police union—its first-ever presidential endorsement.

An exception is the National Association of Black Law Enforcement Officers, which has about 9,000 members out of the nation’s more than 100,000 black police officers. The group has objected to the Trump endorsements, though as a nonprofit it can’t issue endorsements itself.

In this year’s 35 U.S. Senate and 11 gubernatorial races, I’ve found only three Democrats receiving major police endorsements, including two whose GOP opponents won endorsements from other police groups.

How this happened is no mystery. “In 8 minutes 46 seconds, we all went from public servants to public enemies,” Mr. Yoes says, a reference to the George Floyd video. Democrats have sided with Black Lives Matter.


Trump’s Blue Line Could Breach Biden’s Blue Wall

President Trump challenged Joe Biden in the first debate to name one police endorsement he’d received. Mr. Biden couldn’t—virtually all police organizations have endorsed Mr. Trump. Police groups are endorsing Republicans at every level, many for the first time and by overwhelming votes.

The nation’s largest police organization, with 355,000 members, is the Fraternal Order of Police. Patrick Yoes, the national group’s president, tells me every officer in the FOP has a vote. The process starts with officers voting at 2,100 local lodges, each of which votes at the state level. Then, at the national level, the states each cast a vote. This year the national vote was unanimous for Mr. Trump. Also endorsing Mr. Trump are the National Association of Police Organizations, with around 241,000 members, the International Union of Police Associations (100,000), and the Police Benevolent Association of New York City (24,000), the largest big-city police union—its first-ever presidential endorsement.

An exception is the National Association of Black Law Enforcement Officers, which has about 9,000 members out of the nation’s more than 100,000 black police officers. The group has objected to the Trump endorsements, though as a nonprofit it can’t issue endorsements itself.

In this year’s 35 U.S. Senate and 11 gubernatorial races, I’ve found only three Democrats receiving major police endorsements, including two whose GOP opponents won endorsements from other police groups.

How this happened is no mystery. “In 8 minutes 46 seconds, we all went from public servants to public enemies,” Mr. Yoes says, a reference to the George Floyd video. Democrats have sided with Black Lives Matter.


Trump’s Blue Line Could Breach Biden’s Blue Wall

President Trump challenged Joe Biden in the first debate to name one police endorsement he’d received. Mr. Biden couldn’t—virtually all police organizations have endorsed Mr. Trump. Police groups are endorsing Republicans at every level, many for the first time and by overwhelming votes.

The nation’s largest police organization, with 355,000 members, is the Fraternal Order of Police. Patrick Yoes, the national group’s president, tells me every officer in the FOP has a vote. The process starts with officers voting at 2,100 local lodges, each of which votes at the state level. Then, at the national level, the states each cast a vote. This year the national vote was unanimous for Mr. Trump. Also endorsing Mr. Trump are the National Association of Police Organizations, with around 241,000 members, the International Union of Police Associations (100,000), and the Police Benevolent Association of New York City (24,000), the largest big-city police union—its first-ever presidential endorsement.

An exception is the National Association of Black Law Enforcement Officers, which has about 9,000 members out of the nation’s more than 100,000 black police officers. The group has objected to the Trump endorsements, though as a nonprofit it can’t issue endorsements itself.

In this year’s 35 U.S. Senate and 11 gubernatorial races, I’ve found only three Democrats receiving major police endorsements, including two whose GOP opponents won endorsements from other police groups.

How this happened is no mystery. “In 8 minutes 46 seconds, we all went from public servants to public enemies,” Mr. Yoes says, a reference to the George Floyd video. Democrats have sided with Black Lives Matter.


Trump’s Blue Line Could Breach Biden’s Blue Wall

President Trump challenged Joe Biden in the first debate to name one police endorsement he’d received. Mr. Biden couldn’t—virtually all police organizations have endorsed Mr. Trump. Police groups are endorsing Republicans at every level, many for the first time and by overwhelming votes.

The nation’s largest police organization, with 355,000 members, is the Fraternal Order of Police. Patrick Yoes, the national group’s president, tells me every officer in the FOP has a vote. The process starts with officers voting at 2,100 local lodges, each of which votes at the state level. Then, at the national level, the states each cast a vote. This year the national vote was unanimous for Mr. Trump. Also endorsing Mr. Trump are the National Association of Police Organizations, with around 241,000 members, the International Union of Police Associations (100,000), and the Police Benevolent Association of New York City (24,000), the largest big-city police union—its first-ever presidential endorsement.

An exception is the National Association of Black Law Enforcement Officers, which has about 9,000 members out of the nation’s more than 100,000 black police officers. The group has objected to the Trump endorsements, though as a nonprofit it can’t issue endorsements itself.

In this year’s 35 U.S. Senate and 11 gubernatorial races, I’ve found only three Democrats receiving major police endorsements, including two whose GOP opponents won endorsements from other police groups.

How this happened is no mystery. “In 8 minutes 46 seconds, we all went from public servants to public enemies,” Mr. Yoes says, a reference to the George Floyd video. Democrats have sided with Black Lives Matter.


Trump’s Blue Line Could Breach Biden’s Blue Wall

President Trump challenged Joe Biden in the first debate to name one police endorsement he’d received. Mr. Biden couldn’t—virtually all police organizations have endorsed Mr. Trump. Police groups are endorsing Republicans at every level, many for the first time and by overwhelming votes.

The nation’s largest police organization, with 355,000 members, is the Fraternal Order of Police. Patrick Yoes, the national group’s president, tells me every officer in the FOP has a vote. The process starts with officers voting at 2,100 local lodges, each of which votes at the state level. Then, at the national level, the states each cast a vote. This year the national vote was unanimous for Mr. Trump. Also endorsing Mr. Trump are the National Association of Police Organizations, with around 241,000 members, the International Union of Police Associations (100,000), and the Police Benevolent Association of New York City (24,000), the largest big-city police union—its first-ever presidential endorsement.

An exception is the National Association of Black Law Enforcement Officers, which has about 9,000 members out of the nation’s more than 100,000 black police officers. The group has objected to the Trump endorsements, though as a nonprofit it can’t issue endorsements itself.

In this year’s 35 U.S. Senate and 11 gubernatorial races, I’ve found only three Democrats receiving major police endorsements, including two whose GOP opponents won endorsements from other police groups.

How this happened is no mystery. “In 8 minutes 46 seconds, we all went from public servants to public enemies,” Mr. Yoes says, a reference to the George Floyd video. Democrats have sided with Black Lives Matter.


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