New recipes

When is St. Patrick's Day 2018?

When is St. Patrick's Day 2018?


You're in luck: We have everything you need to plan your celebration

istockphoto.com

Happy St. Patty's Day, lads!

On St. Patrick's Day, it seems like everyone suddenly claims to be at least a little Irish. It's not all green beer and cocktails. Irish tradition dictates certain foods that are typically served on the holiday, for instance. Other countries host rowdy, unique celebrations of their own.

No matter how you celebrate, this is a holiday you don't want to miss. But with all the excitement around springtime and the rush of warmer weather, you might forget the day is coming; the holiday of drinking and dancing could easily sneak up on you.

Every year, St. Patrick's Day falls on March 17. This is because March 17 is the anniversary of the death of Saint Patrick, the foremost patron saint of Ireland. This year, though, everyone got a little extra lucky: St. Patrick's Day is falling on a Saturday in 2018. So as spring rolls around, it's time to start planning.

But fret not. The Daily Meal has all the resources you need to host or attend whatever festivities you desire.

If you're looking for a more traditional celebration of St. Patty's Day, learn to cook a few of the most traditional Irish dishes served on the holiday. Use a few of these specially crafted recipes to eat like a true Irishman. And for dessert, serve a delectable sweet treat or two to your eager guests using these simple recipes.

To cook something a little more wacky and fun, read up on some of the craziest foods that have ever been dyed green. Make some adorable treats using Lucky Charm's cereal; these recipes look so good, they're the only treat you'll want to find at the end of the rainbow. Not everything from your feast has to be indulgent, though. Leafy greens can be used in some festive recipes to contribute to your healthy, happy St. Patty's Day.

Of course, you can't forget about the most raved about part of St. Patrick's Day celebrations, historically: Alcohol. If you're over 21, there's a good chance your partying is going to involve some booze, dyed green or not. Diversify your drink menu with some Irish beers that aren't Guinness (though Guinness might be the healthiest choice). Live it up at one of America's best Irish pubs. Above all, though, be safe this holiday. Protect your liver with these 4 simple tactics and order some hearty, delicious Irish food to soak up all the booze.

From drink recommendations to hosting guides, we've got you covered. Find all this and more on The Daily Meal's St. Patrick's Day page.


St. Patrick’s Day recipes from a famous Michelin-star chef

WASHINGTON — A plate of green eggs and ham may have sufficed for a St. Patrick’s Day feast when you were a child, but as you’ve grown, so has your palate.

If you’re looking to celebrate March 17 with a more refined menu, Patrick O’Connell, chef and proprietor of The Inn at Little Washington, has some ideas — and none of them involve green food coloring.

His first tip: Take advantage of Mother Nature’s color palette. This time of year, early spring vegetables are more readily available, and they can add a pop of green to any ordinary dish.

At his two-Michelin star restaurant, O’Connell likes to make a puree of Italian flat-leaf parsley. He quickly blanches a big bunch in boiling water, then drops the leaves into ice water. After removing the stems, he puts the herbs into a blender, along with some stock. The end product is a bright green liquid puree.

Related Gallery

Sweet and savory: Here are 16 pie recipes.

O’Connell incorporates the parsley puree into buttery whipped potatoes, which he serves alongside lamb.

“And it becomes this brilliant bright blob of green on the plate that really sets the dish off perfectly,” he said.

He also recommends using the puree in a risotto with morel mushrooms, or even over gnocchi.

Another favorite of O’Connell’s, which is easy for the home chef to master, is what he calls “a tangle tart of greens.” The recipe (see below) pairs perfectly with almost any meat, or can stand by itself as a winter salad.

O’Connell describes the dish as a mixture of sliced cabbage, cooked with a little onion and bacon, and then dressed with vinegar, a pinch of sugar and “lots and lots of mustard seed.”

“It’s wilted down lightly and then you can use that with roast pork, you can use that with fish, we even serve it with a soft shell crab,” O’Connell said.

“It’s a wonderfully versatile accompaniment — a pre-spring vegetable that’s wonderfully crunchy and beautifully green. And at the last minute, you whip into it some leaves of watercress.”

Related News

Cabbage is a staple at most St. Patrick’s Day celebrations, especially when served with corned beef. Unsurprisingly, O’Connell has a way to dress up the leafy green.

He cooks a little onion and bacon in a pan, and then adds thin slices of savoy cabbage, which the chef said is tender and cooks better than standard cabbage. He pours Champagne into the mixture and lets it cook down. Then, he adds cream.

“And it is a very luxurious, gorgeous accompaniment,” O’Connell said.

Of course, Irish cooking isn’t limited to corned beef and greens. O’Connell said another way to incorporate traditional Irish cuisine is with an afternoon tea, or even at the breakfast table with a bowl of oatmeal.

“And of course, the Irish love their oatmeal,” he said.

At The Inn at Little Washington, O’Connell serves a unique type of oatmeal — one “that people can’t live without.” He flavors Irish oats with a little vanilla and maple syrup, and creates a soufflé.

His advice? Place a dollop of the cooked oatmeal in the bottom of a buttered soufflé dish, and then whip egg whites and fold that into another spoonful of the oatmeal.

“You place that on top and you bake it for about 7 or 8 minutes until it’s puffed, and it’s a whole different world,” O’Connell said.

“Oatmeal has never tasted so elegant.”

O’Connell’s been thinking a lot about Irish cuisine lately — and not just because of St. Patrick’s Day. This April, the Virginia-based chef is traveling to Ireland to cook at the award-winning country house hotel, Ballyfin.

O’Connell’s six-course tasting menu will include dishes such as crispy napoleon of chilled Maine lobster with Royal Oscietra caviar, and truffle-stuffed breast of Kilkenny Farm Chicken on savoy cabbage, braised in Champagne. This event is just one of many planned for 40 years of celebrating the Inn at Little Washington, and tickets are still available.

“There are many ways to update and refine the classic flavors of Irish cuisine … and anyone who’s spent time in Ireland realizes what great products they’ve always had to work with,” O’Connell said.

“I think if people just think differently about the flavors of Ireland, as we’ve always had to do with the flavors of American cuisine, you just become a little creative in how you present them.”

This St. Patrick’s Day, test out O’Connell’s parsley puree in your “green eggs.” You may just stumble on a more authentic and delicious way to celebrate the holiday.

Recipe: A Tangle Tart of Greens

Courtesy Patrick O’Connell, The Inn at Little Washington

  • ½ head savoy cabbage
  • 1 strip thick bacon or 2 strips thin, diced
  • ½ large red onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 tablespoon mustard seeds
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • ¼ cup white wine vinegar
  • ½ bunch watercress, coarse stems removed
  • Freshly ground pepper to taste
  1. Core and coarsely shred the cabbage with a sharp knife or mandoline.
  2. In a 10-inch skillet, sauté the bacon over medium heat until lightly browned. Add the onion and cabbage and sauté until the cabbage begins to wilt. Add the mustard seeds, sugar, and vinegar and cook until the cabbage is tender but still crisp.
  3. Remove the skillet from the heat. Toss in the watercress and season with pepper. Serve warm.

Additional recipes mentioned above can be found in O’Connell’s cookbooks, “Patrick O’Connell’s Refined American Cuisine” and “The Inn at Little Washington Cookbook.”


St. Patrick’s Day recipes from a famous Michelin-star chef

WASHINGTON — A plate of green eggs and ham may have sufficed for a St. Patrick’s Day feast when you were a child, but as you’ve grown, so has your palate.

If you’re looking to celebrate March 17 with a more refined menu, Patrick O’Connell, chef and proprietor of The Inn at Little Washington, has some ideas — and none of them involve green food coloring.

His first tip: Take advantage of Mother Nature’s color palette. This time of year, early spring vegetables are more readily available, and they can add a pop of green to any ordinary dish.

At his two-Michelin star restaurant, O’Connell likes to make a puree of Italian flat-leaf parsley. He quickly blanches a big bunch in boiling water, then drops the leaves into ice water. After removing the stems, he puts the herbs into a blender, along with some stock. The end product is a bright green liquid puree.

Related Gallery

Sweet and savory: Here are 16 pie recipes.

O’Connell incorporates the parsley puree into buttery whipped potatoes, which he serves alongside lamb.

“And it becomes this brilliant bright blob of green on the plate that really sets the dish off perfectly,” he said.

He also recommends using the puree in a risotto with morel mushrooms, or even over gnocchi.

Another favorite of O’Connell’s, which is easy for the home chef to master, is what he calls “a tangle tart of greens.” The recipe (see below) pairs perfectly with almost any meat, or can stand by itself as a winter salad.

O’Connell describes the dish as a mixture of sliced cabbage, cooked with a little onion and bacon, and then dressed with vinegar, a pinch of sugar and “lots and lots of mustard seed.”

“It’s wilted down lightly and then you can use that with roast pork, you can use that with fish, we even serve it with a soft shell crab,” O’Connell said.

“It’s a wonderfully versatile accompaniment — a pre-spring vegetable that’s wonderfully crunchy and beautifully green. And at the last minute, you whip into it some leaves of watercress.”

Related News

Cabbage is a staple at most St. Patrick’s Day celebrations, especially when served with corned beef. Unsurprisingly, O’Connell has a way to dress up the leafy green.

He cooks a little onion and bacon in a pan, and then adds thin slices of savoy cabbage, which the chef said is tender and cooks better than standard cabbage. He pours Champagne into the mixture and lets it cook down. Then, he adds cream.

“And it is a very luxurious, gorgeous accompaniment,” O’Connell said.

Of course, Irish cooking isn’t limited to corned beef and greens. O’Connell said another way to incorporate traditional Irish cuisine is with an afternoon tea, or even at the breakfast table with a bowl of oatmeal.

“And of course, the Irish love their oatmeal,” he said.

At The Inn at Little Washington, O’Connell serves a unique type of oatmeal — one “that people can’t live without.” He flavors Irish oats with a little vanilla and maple syrup, and creates a soufflé.

His advice? Place a dollop of the cooked oatmeal in the bottom of a buttered soufflé dish, and then whip egg whites and fold that into another spoonful of the oatmeal.

“You place that on top and you bake it for about 7 or 8 minutes until it’s puffed, and it’s a whole different world,” O’Connell said.

“Oatmeal has never tasted so elegant.”

O’Connell’s been thinking a lot about Irish cuisine lately — and not just because of St. Patrick’s Day. This April, the Virginia-based chef is traveling to Ireland to cook at the award-winning country house hotel, Ballyfin.

O’Connell’s six-course tasting menu will include dishes such as crispy napoleon of chilled Maine lobster with Royal Oscietra caviar, and truffle-stuffed breast of Kilkenny Farm Chicken on savoy cabbage, braised in Champagne. This event is just one of many planned for 40 years of celebrating the Inn at Little Washington, and tickets are still available.

“There are many ways to update and refine the classic flavors of Irish cuisine … and anyone who’s spent time in Ireland realizes what great products they’ve always had to work with,” O’Connell said.

“I think if people just think differently about the flavors of Ireland, as we’ve always had to do with the flavors of American cuisine, you just become a little creative in how you present them.”

This St. Patrick’s Day, test out O’Connell’s parsley puree in your “green eggs.” You may just stumble on a more authentic and delicious way to celebrate the holiday.

Recipe: A Tangle Tart of Greens

Courtesy Patrick O’Connell, The Inn at Little Washington

  • ½ head savoy cabbage
  • 1 strip thick bacon or 2 strips thin, diced
  • ½ large red onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 tablespoon mustard seeds
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • ¼ cup white wine vinegar
  • ½ bunch watercress, coarse stems removed
  • Freshly ground pepper to taste
  1. Core and coarsely shred the cabbage with a sharp knife or mandoline.
  2. In a 10-inch skillet, sauté the bacon over medium heat until lightly browned. Add the onion and cabbage and sauté until the cabbage begins to wilt. Add the mustard seeds, sugar, and vinegar and cook until the cabbage is tender but still crisp.
  3. Remove the skillet from the heat. Toss in the watercress and season with pepper. Serve warm.

Additional recipes mentioned above can be found in O’Connell’s cookbooks, “Patrick O’Connell’s Refined American Cuisine” and “The Inn at Little Washington Cookbook.”


St. Patrick’s Day recipes from a famous Michelin-star chef

WASHINGTON — A plate of green eggs and ham may have sufficed for a St. Patrick’s Day feast when you were a child, but as you’ve grown, so has your palate.

If you’re looking to celebrate March 17 with a more refined menu, Patrick O’Connell, chef and proprietor of The Inn at Little Washington, has some ideas — and none of them involve green food coloring.

His first tip: Take advantage of Mother Nature’s color palette. This time of year, early spring vegetables are more readily available, and they can add a pop of green to any ordinary dish.

At his two-Michelin star restaurant, O’Connell likes to make a puree of Italian flat-leaf parsley. He quickly blanches a big bunch in boiling water, then drops the leaves into ice water. After removing the stems, he puts the herbs into a blender, along with some stock. The end product is a bright green liquid puree.

Related Gallery

Sweet and savory: Here are 16 pie recipes.

O’Connell incorporates the parsley puree into buttery whipped potatoes, which he serves alongside lamb.

“And it becomes this brilliant bright blob of green on the plate that really sets the dish off perfectly,” he said.

He also recommends using the puree in a risotto with morel mushrooms, or even over gnocchi.

Another favorite of O’Connell’s, which is easy for the home chef to master, is what he calls “a tangle tart of greens.” The recipe (see below) pairs perfectly with almost any meat, or can stand by itself as a winter salad.

O’Connell describes the dish as a mixture of sliced cabbage, cooked with a little onion and bacon, and then dressed with vinegar, a pinch of sugar and “lots and lots of mustard seed.”

“It’s wilted down lightly and then you can use that with roast pork, you can use that with fish, we even serve it with a soft shell crab,” O’Connell said.

“It’s a wonderfully versatile accompaniment — a pre-spring vegetable that’s wonderfully crunchy and beautifully green. And at the last minute, you whip into it some leaves of watercress.”

Related News

Cabbage is a staple at most St. Patrick’s Day celebrations, especially when served with corned beef. Unsurprisingly, O’Connell has a way to dress up the leafy green.

He cooks a little onion and bacon in a pan, and then adds thin slices of savoy cabbage, which the chef said is tender and cooks better than standard cabbage. He pours Champagne into the mixture and lets it cook down. Then, he adds cream.

“And it is a very luxurious, gorgeous accompaniment,” O’Connell said.

Of course, Irish cooking isn’t limited to corned beef and greens. O’Connell said another way to incorporate traditional Irish cuisine is with an afternoon tea, or even at the breakfast table with a bowl of oatmeal.

“And of course, the Irish love their oatmeal,” he said.

At The Inn at Little Washington, O’Connell serves a unique type of oatmeal — one “that people can’t live without.” He flavors Irish oats with a little vanilla and maple syrup, and creates a soufflé.

His advice? Place a dollop of the cooked oatmeal in the bottom of a buttered soufflé dish, and then whip egg whites and fold that into another spoonful of the oatmeal.

“You place that on top and you bake it for about 7 or 8 minutes until it’s puffed, and it’s a whole different world,” O’Connell said.

“Oatmeal has never tasted so elegant.”

O’Connell’s been thinking a lot about Irish cuisine lately — and not just because of St. Patrick’s Day. This April, the Virginia-based chef is traveling to Ireland to cook at the award-winning country house hotel, Ballyfin.

O’Connell’s six-course tasting menu will include dishes such as crispy napoleon of chilled Maine lobster with Royal Oscietra caviar, and truffle-stuffed breast of Kilkenny Farm Chicken on savoy cabbage, braised in Champagne. This event is just one of many planned for 40 years of celebrating the Inn at Little Washington, and tickets are still available.

“There are many ways to update and refine the classic flavors of Irish cuisine … and anyone who’s spent time in Ireland realizes what great products they’ve always had to work with,” O’Connell said.

“I think if people just think differently about the flavors of Ireland, as we’ve always had to do with the flavors of American cuisine, you just become a little creative in how you present them.”

This St. Patrick’s Day, test out O’Connell’s parsley puree in your “green eggs.” You may just stumble on a more authentic and delicious way to celebrate the holiday.

Recipe: A Tangle Tart of Greens

Courtesy Patrick O’Connell, The Inn at Little Washington

  • ½ head savoy cabbage
  • 1 strip thick bacon or 2 strips thin, diced
  • ½ large red onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 tablespoon mustard seeds
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • ¼ cup white wine vinegar
  • ½ bunch watercress, coarse stems removed
  • Freshly ground pepper to taste
  1. Core and coarsely shred the cabbage with a sharp knife or mandoline.
  2. In a 10-inch skillet, sauté the bacon over medium heat until lightly browned. Add the onion and cabbage and sauté until the cabbage begins to wilt. Add the mustard seeds, sugar, and vinegar and cook until the cabbage is tender but still crisp.
  3. Remove the skillet from the heat. Toss in the watercress and season with pepper. Serve warm.

Additional recipes mentioned above can be found in O’Connell’s cookbooks, “Patrick O’Connell’s Refined American Cuisine” and “The Inn at Little Washington Cookbook.”


St. Patrick’s Day recipes from a famous Michelin-star chef

WASHINGTON — A plate of green eggs and ham may have sufficed for a St. Patrick’s Day feast when you were a child, but as you’ve grown, so has your palate.

If you’re looking to celebrate March 17 with a more refined menu, Patrick O’Connell, chef and proprietor of The Inn at Little Washington, has some ideas — and none of them involve green food coloring.

His first tip: Take advantage of Mother Nature’s color palette. This time of year, early spring vegetables are more readily available, and they can add a pop of green to any ordinary dish.

At his two-Michelin star restaurant, O’Connell likes to make a puree of Italian flat-leaf parsley. He quickly blanches a big bunch in boiling water, then drops the leaves into ice water. After removing the stems, he puts the herbs into a blender, along with some stock. The end product is a bright green liquid puree.

Related Gallery

Sweet and savory: Here are 16 pie recipes.

O’Connell incorporates the parsley puree into buttery whipped potatoes, which he serves alongside lamb.

“And it becomes this brilliant bright blob of green on the plate that really sets the dish off perfectly,” he said.

He also recommends using the puree in a risotto with morel mushrooms, or even over gnocchi.

Another favorite of O’Connell’s, which is easy for the home chef to master, is what he calls “a tangle tart of greens.” The recipe (see below) pairs perfectly with almost any meat, or can stand by itself as a winter salad.

O’Connell describes the dish as a mixture of sliced cabbage, cooked with a little onion and bacon, and then dressed with vinegar, a pinch of sugar and “lots and lots of mustard seed.”

“It’s wilted down lightly and then you can use that with roast pork, you can use that with fish, we even serve it with a soft shell crab,” O’Connell said.

“It’s a wonderfully versatile accompaniment — a pre-spring vegetable that’s wonderfully crunchy and beautifully green. And at the last minute, you whip into it some leaves of watercress.”

Related News

Cabbage is a staple at most St. Patrick’s Day celebrations, especially when served with corned beef. Unsurprisingly, O’Connell has a way to dress up the leafy green.

He cooks a little onion and bacon in a pan, and then adds thin slices of savoy cabbage, which the chef said is tender and cooks better than standard cabbage. He pours Champagne into the mixture and lets it cook down. Then, he adds cream.

“And it is a very luxurious, gorgeous accompaniment,” O’Connell said.

Of course, Irish cooking isn’t limited to corned beef and greens. O’Connell said another way to incorporate traditional Irish cuisine is with an afternoon tea, or even at the breakfast table with a bowl of oatmeal.

“And of course, the Irish love their oatmeal,” he said.

At The Inn at Little Washington, O’Connell serves a unique type of oatmeal — one “that people can’t live without.” He flavors Irish oats with a little vanilla and maple syrup, and creates a soufflé.

His advice? Place a dollop of the cooked oatmeal in the bottom of a buttered soufflé dish, and then whip egg whites and fold that into another spoonful of the oatmeal.

“You place that on top and you bake it for about 7 or 8 minutes until it’s puffed, and it’s a whole different world,” O’Connell said.

“Oatmeal has never tasted so elegant.”

O’Connell’s been thinking a lot about Irish cuisine lately — and not just because of St. Patrick’s Day. This April, the Virginia-based chef is traveling to Ireland to cook at the award-winning country house hotel, Ballyfin.

O’Connell’s six-course tasting menu will include dishes such as crispy napoleon of chilled Maine lobster with Royal Oscietra caviar, and truffle-stuffed breast of Kilkenny Farm Chicken on savoy cabbage, braised in Champagne. This event is just one of many planned for 40 years of celebrating the Inn at Little Washington, and tickets are still available.

“There are many ways to update and refine the classic flavors of Irish cuisine … and anyone who’s spent time in Ireland realizes what great products they’ve always had to work with,” O’Connell said.

“I think if people just think differently about the flavors of Ireland, as we’ve always had to do with the flavors of American cuisine, you just become a little creative in how you present them.”

This St. Patrick’s Day, test out O’Connell’s parsley puree in your “green eggs.” You may just stumble on a more authentic and delicious way to celebrate the holiday.

Recipe: A Tangle Tart of Greens

Courtesy Patrick O’Connell, The Inn at Little Washington

  • ½ head savoy cabbage
  • 1 strip thick bacon or 2 strips thin, diced
  • ½ large red onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 tablespoon mustard seeds
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • ¼ cup white wine vinegar
  • ½ bunch watercress, coarse stems removed
  • Freshly ground pepper to taste
  1. Core and coarsely shred the cabbage with a sharp knife or mandoline.
  2. In a 10-inch skillet, sauté the bacon over medium heat until lightly browned. Add the onion and cabbage and sauté until the cabbage begins to wilt. Add the mustard seeds, sugar, and vinegar and cook until the cabbage is tender but still crisp.
  3. Remove the skillet from the heat. Toss in the watercress and season with pepper. Serve warm.

Additional recipes mentioned above can be found in O’Connell’s cookbooks, “Patrick O’Connell’s Refined American Cuisine” and “The Inn at Little Washington Cookbook.”


St. Patrick’s Day recipes from a famous Michelin-star chef

WASHINGTON — A plate of green eggs and ham may have sufficed for a St. Patrick’s Day feast when you were a child, but as you’ve grown, so has your palate.

If you’re looking to celebrate March 17 with a more refined menu, Patrick O’Connell, chef and proprietor of The Inn at Little Washington, has some ideas — and none of them involve green food coloring.

His first tip: Take advantage of Mother Nature’s color palette. This time of year, early spring vegetables are more readily available, and they can add a pop of green to any ordinary dish.

At his two-Michelin star restaurant, O’Connell likes to make a puree of Italian flat-leaf parsley. He quickly blanches a big bunch in boiling water, then drops the leaves into ice water. After removing the stems, he puts the herbs into a blender, along with some stock. The end product is a bright green liquid puree.

Related Gallery

Sweet and savory: Here are 16 pie recipes.

O’Connell incorporates the parsley puree into buttery whipped potatoes, which he serves alongside lamb.

“And it becomes this brilliant bright blob of green on the plate that really sets the dish off perfectly,” he said.

He also recommends using the puree in a risotto with morel mushrooms, or even over gnocchi.

Another favorite of O’Connell’s, which is easy for the home chef to master, is what he calls “a tangle tart of greens.” The recipe (see below) pairs perfectly with almost any meat, or can stand by itself as a winter salad.

O’Connell describes the dish as a mixture of sliced cabbage, cooked with a little onion and bacon, and then dressed with vinegar, a pinch of sugar and “lots and lots of mustard seed.”

“It’s wilted down lightly and then you can use that with roast pork, you can use that with fish, we even serve it with a soft shell crab,” O’Connell said.

“It’s a wonderfully versatile accompaniment — a pre-spring vegetable that’s wonderfully crunchy and beautifully green. And at the last minute, you whip into it some leaves of watercress.”

Related News

Cabbage is a staple at most St. Patrick’s Day celebrations, especially when served with corned beef. Unsurprisingly, O’Connell has a way to dress up the leafy green.

He cooks a little onion and bacon in a pan, and then adds thin slices of savoy cabbage, which the chef said is tender and cooks better than standard cabbage. He pours Champagne into the mixture and lets it cook down. Then, he adds cream.

“And it is a very luxurious, gorgeous accompaniment,” O’Connell said.

Of course, Irish cooking isn’t limited to corned beef and greens. O’Connell said another way to incorporate traditional Irish cuisine is with an afternoon tea, or even at the breakfast table with a bowl of oatmeal.

“And of course, the Irish love their oatmeal,” he said.

At The Inn at Little Washington, O’Connell serves a unique type of oatmeal — one “that people can’t live without.” He flavors Irish oats with a little vanilla and maple syrup, and creates a soufflé.

His advice? Place a dollop of the cooked oatmeal in the bottom of a buttered soufflé dish, and then whip egg whites and fold that into another spoonful of the oatmeal.

“You place that on top and you bake it for about 7 or 8 minutes until it’s puffed, and it’s a whole different world,” O’Connell said.

“Oatmeal has never tasted so elegant.”

O’Connell’s been thinking a lot about Irish cuisine lately — and not just because of St. Patrick’s Day. This April, the Virginia-based chef is traveling to Ireland to cook at the award-winning country house hotel, Ballyfin.

O’Connell’s six-course tasting menu will include dishes such as crispy napoleon of chilled Maine lobster with Royal Oscietra caviar, and truffle-stuffed breast of Kilkenny Farm Chicken on savoy cabbage, braised in Champagne. This event is just one of many planned for 40 years of celebrating the Inn at Little Washington, and tickets are still available.

“There are many ways to update and refine the classic flavors of Irish cuisine … and anyone who’s spent time in Ireland realizes what great products they’ve always had to work with,” O’Connell said.

“I think if people just think differently about the flavors of Ireland, as we’ve always had to do with the flavors of American cuisine, you just become a little creative in how you present them.”

This St. Patrick’s Day, test out O’Connell’s parsley puree in your “green eggs.” You may just stumble on a more authentic and delicious way to celebrate the holiday.

Recipe: A Tangle Tart of Greens

Courtesy Patrick O’Connell, The Inn at Little Washington

  • ½ head savoy cabbage
  • 1 strip thick bacon or 2 strips thin, diced
  • ½ large red onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 tablespoon mustard seeds
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • ¼ cup white wine vinegar
  • ½ bunch watercress, coarse stems removed
  • Freshly ground pepper to taste
  1. Core and coarsely shred the cabbage with a sharp knife or mandoline.
  2. In a 10-inch skillet, sauté the bacon over medium heat until lightly browned. Add the onion and cabbage and sauté until the cabbage begins to wilt. Add the mustard seeds, sugar, and vinegar and cook until the cabbage is tender but still crisp.
  3. Remove the skillet from the heat. Toss in the watercress and season with pepper. Serve warm.

Additional recipes mentioned above can be found in O’Connell’s cookbooks, “Patrick O’Connell’s Refined American Cuisine” and “The Inn at Little Washington Cookbook.”


St. Patrick’s Day recipes from a famous Michelin-star chef

WASHINGTON — A plate of green eggs and ham may have sufficed for a St. Patrick’s Day feast when you were a child, but as you’ve grown, so has your palate.

If you’re looking to celebrate March 17 with a more refined menu, Patrick O’Connell, chef and proprietor of The Inn at Little Washington, has some ideas — and none of them involve green food coloring.

His first tip: Take advantage of Mother Nature’s color palette. This time of year, early spring vegetables are more readily available, and they can add a pop of green to any ordinary dish.

At his two-Michelin star restaurant, O’Connell likes to make a puree of Italian flat-leaf parsley. He quickly blanches a big bunch in boiling water, then drops the leaves into ice water. After removing the stems, he puts the herbs into a blender, along with some stock. The end product is a bright green liquid puree.

Related Gallery

Sweet and savory: Here are 16 pie recipes.

O’Connell incorporates the parsley puree into buttery whipped potatoes, which he serves alongside lamb.

“And it becomes this brilliant bright blob of green on the plate that really sets the dish off perfectly,” he said.

He also recommends using the puree in a risotto with morel mushrooms, or even over gnocchi.

Another favorite of O’Connell’s, which is easy for the home chef to master, is what he calls “a tangle tart of greens.” The recipe (see below) pairs perfectly with almost any meat, or can stand by itself as a winter salad.

O’Connell describes the dish as a mixture of sliced cabbage, cooked with a little onion and bacon, and then dressed with vinegar, a pinch of sugar and “lots and lots of mustard seed.”

“It’s wilted down lightly and then you can use that with roast pork, you can use that with fish, we even serve it with a soft shell crab,” O’Connell said.

“It’s a wonderfully versatile accompaniment — a pre-spring vegetable that’s wonderfully crunchy and beautifully green. And at the last minute, you whip into it some leaves of watercress.”

Related News

Cabbage is a staple at most St. Patrick’s Day celebrations, especially when served with corned beef. Unsurprisingly, O’Connell has a way to dress up the leafy green.

He cooks a little onion and bacon in a pan, and then adds thin slices of savoy cabbage, which the chef said is tender and cooks better than standard cabbage. He pours Champagne into the mixture and lets it cook down. Then, he adds cream.

“And it is a very luxurious, gorgeous accompaniment,” O’Connell said.

Of course, Irish cooking isn’t limited to corned beef and greens. O’Connell said another way to incorporate traditional Irish cuisine is with an afternoon tea, or even at the breakfast table with a bowl of oatmeal.

“And of course, the Irish love their oatmeal,” he said.

At The Inn at Little Washington, O’Connell serves a unique type of oatmeal — one “that people can’t live without.” He flavors Irish oats with a little vanilla and maple syrup, and creates a soufflé.

His advice? Place a dollop of the cooked oatmeal in the bottom of a buttered soufflé dish, and then whip egg whites and fold that into another spoonful of the oatmeal.

“You place that on top and you bake it for about 7 or 8 minutes until it’s puffed, and it’s a whole different world,” O’Connell said.

“Oatmeal has never tasted so elegant.”

O’Connell’s been thinking a lot about Irish cuisine lately — and not just because of St. Patrick’s Day. This April, the Virginia-based chef is traveling to Ireland to cook at the award-winning country house hotel, Ballyfin.

O’Connell’s six-course tasting menu will include dishes such as crispy napoleon of chilled Maine lobster with Royal Oscietra caviar, and truffle-stuffed breast of Kilkenny Farm Chicken on savoy cabbage, braised in Champagne. This event is just one of many planned for 40 years of celebrating the Inn at Little Washington, and tickets are still available.

“There are many ways to update and refine the classic flavors of Irish cuisine … and anyone who’s spent time in Ireland realizes what great products they’ve always had to work with,” O’Connell said.

“I think if people just think differently about the flavors of Ireland, as we’ve always had to do with the flavors of American cuisine, you just become a little creative in how you present them.”

This St. Patrick’s Day, test out O’Connell’s parsley puree in your “green eggs.” You may just stumble on a more authentic and delicious way to celebrate the holiday.

Recipe: A Tangle Tart of Greens

Courtesy Patrick O’Connell, The Inn at Little Washington

  • ½ head savoy cabbage
  • 1 strip thick bacon or 2 strips thin, diced
  • ½ large red onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 tablespoon mustard seeds
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • ¼ cup white wine vinegar
  • ½ bunch watercress, coarse stems removed
  • Freshly ground pepper to taste
  1. Core and coarsely shred the cabbage with a sharp knife or mandoline.
  2. In a 10-inch skillet, sauté the bacon over medium heat until lightly browned. Add the onion and cabbage and sauté until the cabbage begins to wilt. Add the mustard seeds, sugar, and vinegar and cook until the cabbage is tender but still crisp.
  3. Remove the skillet from the heat. Toss in the watercress and season with pepper. Serve warm.

Additional recipes mentioned above can be found in O’Connell’s cookbooks, “Patrick O’Connell’s Refined American Cuisine” and “The Inn at Little Washington Cookbook.”


St. Patrick’s Day recipes from a famous Michelin-star chef

WASHINGTON — A plate of green eggs and ham may have sufficed for a St. Patrick’s Day feast when you were a child, but as you’ve grown, so has your palate.

If you’re looking to celebrate March 17 with a more refined menu, Patrick O’Connell, chef and proprietor of The Inn at Little Washington, has some ideas — and none of them involve green food coloring.

His first tip: Take advantage of Mother Nature’s color palette. This time of year, early spring vegetables are more readily available, and they can add a pop of green to any ordinary dish.

At his two-Michelin star restaurant, O’Connell likes to make a puree of Italian flat-leaf parsley. He quickly blanches a big bunch in boiling water, then drops the leaves into ice water. After removing the stems, he puts the herbs into a blender, along with some stock. The end product is a bright green liquid puree.

Related Gallery

Sweet and savory: Here are 16 pie recipes.

O’Connell incorporates the parsley puree into buttery whipped potatoes, which he serves alongside lamb.

“And it becomes this brilliant bright blob of green on the plate that really sets the dish off perfectly,” he said.

He also recommends using the puree in a risotto with morel mushrooms, or even over gnocchi.

Another favorite of O’Connell’s, which is easy for the home chef to master, is what he calls “a tangle tart of greens.” The recipe (see below) pairs perfectly with almost any meat, or can stand by itself as a winter salad.

O’Connell describes the dish as a mixture of sliced cabbage, cooked with a little onion and bacon, and then dressed with vinegar, a pinch of sugar and “lots and lots of mustard seed.”

“It’s wilted down lightly and then you can use that with roast pork, you can use that with fish, we even serve it with a soft shell crab,” O’Connell said.

“It’s a wonderfully versatile accompaniment — a pre-spring vegetable that’s wonderfully crunchy and beautifully green. And at the last minute, you whip into it some leaves of watercress.”

Related News

Cabbage is a staple at most St. Patrick’s Day celebrations, especially when served with corned beef. Unsurprisingly, O’Connell has a way to dress up the leafy green.

He cooks a little onion and bacon in a pan, and then adds thin slices of savoy cabbage, which the chef said is tender and cooks better than standard cabbage. He pours Champagne into the mixture and lets it cook down. Then, he adds cream.

“And it is a very luxurious, gorgeous accompaniment,” O’Connell said.

Of course, Irish cooking isn’t limited to corned beef and greens. O’Connell said another way to incorporate traditional Irish cuisine is with an afternoon tea, or even at the breakfast table with a bowl of oatmeal.

“And of course, the Irish love their oatmeal,” he said.

At The Inn at Little Washington, O’Connell serves a unique type of oatmeal — one “that people can’t live without.” He flavors Irish oats with a little vanilla and maple syrup, and creates a soufflé.

His advice? Place a dollop of the cooked oatmeal in the bottom of a buttered soufflé dish, and then whip egg whites and fold that into another spoonful of the oatmeal.

“You place that on top and you bake it for about 7 or 8 minutes until it’s puffed, and it’s a whole different world,” O’Connell said.

“Oatmeal has never tasted so elegant.”

O’Connell’s been thinking a lot about Irish cuisine lately — and not just because of St. Patrick’s Day. This April, the Virginia-based chef is traveling to Ireland to cook at the award-winning country house hotel, Ballyfin.

O’Connell’s six-course tasting menu will include dishes such as crispy napoleon of chilled Maine lobster with Royal Oscietra caviar, and truffle-stuffed breast of Kilkenny Farm Chicken on savoy cabbage, braised in Champagne. This event is just one of many planned for 40 years of celebrating the Inn at Little Washington, and tickets are still available.

“There are many ways to update and refine the classic flavors of Irish cuisine … and anyone who’s spent time in Ireland realizes what great products they’ve always had to work with,” O’Connell said.

“I think if people just think differently about the flavors of Ireland, as we’ve always had to do with the flavors of American cuisine, you just become a little creative in how you present them.”

This St. Patrick’s Day, test out O’Connell’s parsley puree in your “green eggs.” You may just stumble on a more authentic and delicious way to celebrate the holiday.

Recipe: A Tangle Tart of Greens

Courtesy Patrick O’Connell, The Inn at Little Washington

  • ½ head savoy cabbage
  • 1 strip thick bacon or 2 strips thin, diced
  • ½ large red onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 tablespoon mustard seeds
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • ¼ cup white wine vinegar
  • ½ bunch watercress, coarse stems removed
  • Freshly ground pepper to taste
  1. Core and coarsely shred the cabbage with a sharp knife or mandoline.
  2. In a 10-inch skillet, sauté the bacon over medium heat until lightly browned. Add the onion and cabbage and sauté until the cabbage begins to wilt. Add the mustard seeds, sugar, and vinegar and cook until the cabbage is tender but still crisp.
  3. Remove the skillet from the heat. Toss in the watercress and season with pepper. Serve warm.

Additional recipes mentioned above can be found in O’Connell’s cookbooks, “Patrick O’Connell’s Refined American Cuisine” and “The Inn at Little Washington Cookbook.”


St. Patrick’s Day recipes from a famous Michelin-star chef

WASHINGTON — A plate of green eggs and ham may have sufficed for a St. Patrick’s Day feast when you were a child, but as you’ve grown, so has your palate.

If you’re looking to celebrate March 17 with a more refined menu, Patrick O’Connell, chef and proprietor of The Inn at Little Washington, has some ideas — and none of them involve green food coloring.

His first tip: Take advantage of Mother Nature’s color palette. This time of year, early spring vegetables are more readily available, and they can add a pop of green to any ordinary dish.

At his two-Michelin star restaurant, O’Connell likes to make a puree of Italian flat-leaf parsley. He quickly blanches a big bunch in boiling water, then drops the leaves into ice water. After removing the stems, he puts the herbs into a blender, along with some stock. The end product is a bright green liquid puree.

Related Gallery

Sweet and savory: Here are 16 pie recipes.

O’Connell incorporates the parsley puree into buttery whipped potatoes, which he serves alongside lamb.

“And it becomes this brilliant bright blob of green on the plate that really sets the dish off perfectly,” he said.

He also recommends using the puree in a risotto with morel mushrooms, or even over gnocchi.

Another favorite of O’Connell’s, which is easy for the home chef to master, is what he calls “a tangle tart of greens.” The recipe (see below) pairs perfectly with almost any meat, or can stand by itself as a winter salad.

O’Connell describes the dish as a mixture of sliced cabbage, cooked with a little onion and bacon, and then dressed with vinegar, a pinch of sugar and “lots and lots of mustard seed.”

“It’s wilted down lightly and then you can use that with roast pork, you can use that with fish, we even serve it with a soft shell crab,” O’Connell said.

“It’s a wonderfully versatile accompaniment — a pre-spring vegetable that’s wonderfully crunchy and beautifully green. And at the last minute, you whip into it some leaves of watercress.”

Related News

Cabbage is a staple at most St. Patrick’s Day celebrations, especially when served with corned beef. Unsurprisingly, O’Connell has a way to dress up the leafy green.

He cooks a little onion and bacon in a pan, and then adds thin slices of savoy cabbage, which the chef said is tender and cooks better than standard cabbage. He pours Champagne into the mixture and lets it cook down. Then, he adds cream.

“And it is a very luxurious, gorgeous accompaniment,” O’Connell said.

Of course, Irish cooking isn’t limited to corned beef and greens. O’Connell said another way to incorporate traditional Irish cuisine is with an afternoon tea, or even at the breakfast table with a bowl of oatmeal.

“And of course, the Irish love their oatmeal,” he said.

At The Inn at Little Washington, O’Connell serves a unique type of oatmeal — one “that people can’t live without.” He flavors Irish oats with a little vanilla and maple syrup, and creates a soufflé.

His advice? Place a dollop of the cooked oatmeal in the bottom of a buttered soufflé dish, and then whip egg whites and fold that into another spoonful of the oatmeal.

“You place that on top and you bake it for about 7 or 8 minutes until it’s puffed, and it’s a whole different world,” O’Connell said.

“Oatmeal has never tasted so elegant.”

O’Connell’s been thinking a lot about Irish cuisine lately — and not just because of St. Patrick’s Day. This April, the Virginia-based chef is traveling to Ireland to cook at the award-winning country house hotel, Ballyfin.

O’Connell’s six-course tasting menu will include dishes such as crispy napoleon of chilled Maine lobster with Royal Oscietra caviar, and truffle-stuffed breast of Kilkenny Farm Chicken on savoy cabbage, braised in Champagne. This event is just one of many planned for 40 years of celebrating the Inn at Little Washington, and tickets are still available.

“There are many ways to update and refine the classic flavors of Irish cuisine … and anyone who’s spent time in Ireland realizes what great products they’ve always had to work with,” O’Connell said.

“I think if people just think differently about the flavors of Ireland, as we’ve always had to do with the flavors of American cuisine, you just become a little creative in how you present them.”

This St. Patrick’s Day, test out O’Connell’s parsley puree in your “green eggs.” You may just stumble on a more authentic and delicious way to celebrate the holiday.

Recipe: A Tangle Tart of Greens

Courtesy Patrick O’Connell, The Inn at Little Washington

  • ½ head savoy cabbage
  • 1 strip thick bacon or 2 strips thin, diced
  • ½ large red onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 tablespoon mustard seeds
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • ¼ cup white wine vinegar
  • ½ bunch watercress, coarse stems removed
  • Freshly ground pepper to taste
  1. Core and coarsely shred the cabbage with a sharp knife or mandoline.
  2. In a 10-inch skillet, sauté the bacon over medium heat until lightly browned. Add the onion and cabbage and sauté until the cabbage begins to wilt. Add the mustard seeds, sugar, and vinegar and cook until the cabbage is tender but still crisp.
  3. Remove the skillet from the heat. Toss in the watercress and season with pepper. Serve warm.

Additional recipes mentioned above can be found in O’Connell’s cookbooks, “Patrick O’Connell’s Refined American Cuisine” and “The Inn at Little Washington Cookbook.”


St. Patrick’s Day recipes from a famous Michelin-star chef

WASHINGTON — A plate of green eggs and ham may have sufficed for a St. Patrick’s Day feast when you were a child, but as you’ve grown, so has your palate.

If you’re looking to celebrate March 17 with a more refined menu, Patrick O’Connell, chef and proprietor of The Inn at Little Washington, has some ideas — and none of them involve green food coloring.

His first tip: Take advantage of Mother Nature’s color palette. This time of year, early spring vegetables are more readily available, and they can add a pop of green to any ordinary dish.

At his two-Michelin star restaurant, O’Connell likes to make a puree of Italian flat-leaf parsley. He quickly blanches a big bunch in boiling water, then drops the leaves into ice water. After removing the stems, he puts the herbs into a blender, along with some stock. The end product is a bright green liquid puree.

Related Gallery

Sweet and savory: Here are 16 pie recipes.

O’Connell incorporates the parsley puree into buttery whipped potatoes, which he serves alongside lamb.

“And it becomes this brilliant bright blob of green on the plate that really sets the dish off perfectly,” he said.

He also recommends using the puree in a risotto with morel mushrooms, or even over gnocchi.

Another favorite of O’Connell’s, which is easy for the home chef to master, is what he calls “a tangle tart of greens.” The recipe (see below) pairs perfectly with almost any meat, or can stand by itself as a winter salad.

O’Connell describes the dish as a mixture of sliced cabbage, cooked with a little onion and bacon, and then dressed with vinegar, a pinch of sugar and “lots and lots of mustard seed.”

“It’s wilted down lightly and then you can use that with roast pork, you can use that with fish, we even serve it with a soft shell crab,” O’Connell said.

“It’s a wonderfully versatile accompaniment — a pre-spring vegetable that’s wonderfully crunchy and beautifully green. And at the last minute, you whip into it some leaves of watercress.”

Related News

Cabbage is a staple at most St. Patrick’s Day celebrations, especially when served with corned beef. Unsurprisingly, O’Connell has a way to dress up the leafy green.

He cooks a little onion and bacon in a pan, and then adds thin slices of savoy cabbage, which the chef said is tender and cooks better than standard cabbage. He pours Champagne into the mixture and lets it cook down. Then, he adds cream.

“And it is a very luxurious, gorgeous accompaniment,” O’Connell said.

Of course, Irish cooking isn’t limited to corned beef and greens. O’Connell said another way to incorporate traditional Irish cuisine is with an afternoon tea, or even at the breakfast table with a bowl of oatmeal.

“And of course, the Irish love their oatmeal,” he said.

At The Inn at Little Washington, O’Connell serves a unique type of oatmeal — one “that people can’t live without.” He flavors Irish oats with a little vanilla and maple syrup, and creates a soufflé.

His advice? Place a dollop of the cooked oatmeal in the bottom of a buttered soufflé dish, and then whip egg whites and fold that into another spoonful of the oatmeal.

“You place that on top and you bake it for about 7 or 8 minutes until it’s puffed, and it’s a whole different world,” O’Connell said.

“Oatmeal has never tasted so elegant.”

O’Connell’s been thinking a lot about Irish cuisine lately — and not just because of St. Patrick’s Day. This April, the Virginia-based chef is traveling to Ireland to cook at the award-winning country house hotel, Ballyfin.

O’Connell’s six-course tasting menu will include dishes such as crispy napoleon of chilled Maine lobster with Royal Oscietra caviar, and truffle-stuffed breast of Kilkenny Farm Chicken on savoy cabbage, braised in Champagne. This event is just one of many planned for 40 years of celebrating the Inn at Little Washington, and tickets are still available.

“There are many ways to update and refine the classic flavors of Irish cuisine … and anyone who’s spent time in Ireland realizes what great products they’ve always had to work with,” O’Connell said.

“I think if people just think differently about the flavors of Ireland, as we’ve always had to do with the flavors of American cuisine, you just become a little creative in how you present them.”

This St. Patrick’s Day, test out O’Connell’s parsley puree in your “green eggs.” You may just stumble on a more authentic and delicious way to celebrate the holiday.

Recipe: A Tangle Tart of Greens

Courtesy Patrick O’Connell, The Inn at Little Washington

  • ½ head savoy cabbage
  • 1 strip thick bacon or 2 strips thin, diced
  • ½ large red onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 tablespoon mustard seeds
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • ¼ cup white wine vinegar
  • ½ bunch watercress, coarse stems removed
  • Freshly ground pepper to taste
  1. Core and coarsely shred the cabbage with a sharp knife or mandoline.
  2. In a 10-inch skillet, sauté the bacon over medium heat until lightly browned. Add the onion and cabbage and sauté until the cabbage begins to wilt. Add the mustard seeds, sugar, and vinegar and cook until the cabbage is tender but still crisp.
  3. Remove the skillet from the heat. Toss in the watercress and season with pepper. Serve warm.

Additional recipes mentioned above can be found in O’Connell’s cookbooks, “Patrick O’Connell’s Refined American Cuisine” and “The Inn at Little Washington Cookbook.”


St. Patrick’s Day recipes from a famous Michelin-star chef

WASHINGTON — A plate of green eggs and ham may have sufficed for a St. Patrick’s Day feast when you were a child, but as you’ve grown, so has your palate.

If you’re looking to celebrate March 17 with a more refined menu, Patrick O’Connell, chef and proprietor of The Inn at Little Washington, has some ideas — and none of them involve green food coloring.

His first tip: Take advantage of Mother Nature’s color palette. This time of year, early spring vegetables are more readily available, and they can add a pop of green to any ordinary dish.

At his two-Michelin star restaurant, O’Connell likes to make a puree of Italian flat-leaf parsley. He quickly blanches a big bunch in boiling water, then drops the leaves into ice water. After removing the stems, he puts the herbs into a blender, along with some stock. The end product is a bright green liquid puree.

Related Gallery

Sweet and savory: Here are 16 pie recipes.

O’Connell incorporates the parsley puree into buttery whipped potatoes, which he serves alongside lamb.

“And it becomes this brilliant bright blob of green on the plate that really sets the dish off perfectly,” he said.

He also recommends using the puree in a risotto with morel mushrooms, or even over gnocchi.

Another favorite of O’Connell’s, which is easy for the home chef to master, is what he calls “a tangle tart of greens.” The recipe (see below) pairs perfectly with almost any meat, or can stand by itself as a winter salad.

O’Connell describes the dish as a mixture of sliced cabbage, cooked with a little onion and bacon, and then dressed with vinegar, a pinch of sugar and “lots and lots of mustard seed.”

“It’s wilted down lightly and then you can use that with roast pork, you can use that with fish, we even serve it with a soft shell crab,” O’Connell said.

“It’s a wonderfully versatile accompaniment — a pre-spring vegetable that’s wonderfully crunchy and beautifully green. And at the last minute, you whip into it some leaves of watercress.”

Related News

Cabbage is a staple at most St. Patrick’s Day celebrations, especially when served with corned beef. Unsurprisingly, O’Connell has a way to dress up the leafy green.

He cooks a little onion and bacon in a pan, and then adds thin slices of savoy cabbage, which the chef said is tender and cooks better than standard cabbage. He pours Champagne into the mixture and lets it cook down. Then, he adds cream.

“And it is a very luxurious, gorgeous accompaniment,” O’Connell said.

Of course, Irish cooking isn’t limited to corned beef and greens. O’Connell said another way to incorporate traditional Irish cuisine is with an afternoon tea, or even at the breakfast table with a bowl of oatmeal.

“And of course, the Irish love their oatmeal,” he said.

At The Inn at Little Washington, O’Connell serves a unique type of oatmeal — one “that people can’t live without.” He flavors Irish oats with a little vanilla and maple syrup, and creates a soufflé.

His advice? Place a dollop of the cooked oatmeal in the bottom of a buttered soufflé dish, and then whip egg whites and fold that into another spoonful of the oatmeal.

“You place that on top and you bake it for about 7 or 8 minutes until it’s puffed, and it’s a whole different world,” O’Connell said.

“Oatmeal has never tasted so elegant.”

O’Connell’s been thinking a lot about Irish cuisine lately — and not just because of St. Patrick’s Day. This April, the Virginia-based chef is traveling to Ireland to cook at the award-winning country house hotel, Ballyfin.

O’Connell’s six-course tasting menu will include dishes such as crispy napoleon of chilled Maine lobster with Royal Oscietra caviar, and truffle-stuffed breast of Kilkenny Farm Chicken on savoy cabbage, braised in Champagne. This event is just one of many planned for 40 years of celebrating the Inn at Little Washington, and tickets are still available.

“There are many ways to update and refine the classic flavors of Irish cuisine … and anyone who’s spent time in Ireland realizes what great products they’ve always had to work with,” O’Connell said.

“I think if people just think differently about the flavors of Ireland, as we’ve always had to do with the flavors of American cuisine, you just become a little creative in how you present them.”

This St. Patrick’s Day, test out O’Connell’s parsley puree in your “green eggs.” You may just stumble on a more authentic and delicious way to celebrate the holiday.

Recipe: A Tangle Tart of Greens

Courtesy Patrick O’Connell, The Inn at Little Washington

  • ½ head savoy cabbage
  • 1 strip thick bacon or 2 strips thin, diced
  • ½ large red onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 tablespoon mustard seeds
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • ¼ cup white wine vinegar
  • ½ bunch watercress, coarse stems removed
  • Freshly ground pepper to taste
  1. Core and coarsely shred the cabbage with a sharp knife or mandoline.
  2. In a 10-inch skillet, sauté the bacon over medium heat until lightly browned. Add the onion and cabbage and sauté until the cabbage begins to wilt. Add the mustard seeds, sugar, and vinegar and cook until the cabbage is tender but still crisp.
  3. Remove the skillet from the heat. Toss in the watercress and season with pepper. Serve warm.

Additional recipes mentioned above can be found in O’Connell’s cookbooks, “Patrick O’Connell’s Refined American Cuisine” and “The Inn at Little Washington Cookbook.”


Watch the video: St. Patricks Day 2018. University of Dayton