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Watch a Bunch of Celebrities Drink Coffee

Watch a Bunch of Celebrities Drink Coffee


In Jerry Seinfeld's newest series, 'Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee'

Jerry Seinfeld has been hyping up his upcoming show Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee for a while, but there hasn't been much coffee porn until now. The lineup? Ricky Gervais, Michael Richards, Alec Baldwin, Larry David, and more, all promising, all sipping a cup of brew.

In this longer promo, Larry David decides to have an herbal tea instead, drawing judgmental looks from host Seinfeld. "I can talk just as well holding this cup as if there were coffee in it," David says. "What's the difference?"

Well, as anybody who's gone to dinner with a salad-only person knows, it's everything. "We go to an ice cream shop. I get a cone and you get a salad. That's the difference," Seinfeld says. "And you go, 'What? I'm eating, you're eating.' It's the mood." So next time, at least get a chai latte. Luckily, silver fox Alec Baldwin gets a coffee, so no judgment there. The show premieres July 19 at 9 p.m. EDT on Crackle.com. Watch below.

Jessica Chou is an associate editor at The Daily Meal. Follow her on Twitter @jesschou.


RECIPE: Mint Juleps by the Batch

I've come to realize that the Kentucky Derby is a pagan holiday: On the first Saturday in May, a lot of people don ritual costumes, sing ritual songs, and drink ritual libations while they attempt to foresee the future by interpreting a coded and vague bit of poetry written into the past performances in the pages of the Daily Racing Form. Like other holidays rooted in the natural anxiety of changing seasons and uncertain futures, it is best enjoyed by groups. Don't sit alone swilling bourbon and wiring more and more money to your bookie, you'll go completely crazy. Spring is in the air. The high holy day of the Derby is a social celebration. It's time to gather friends and set up a betting pool.

Even up North, the mint has grown enough to warrant harvesting. Its gentle leaves are begging to be muddled. I've come to think that mint juleps are best made one at a time, or in small numbers at most, from fresh mint and sugar topped with bourbon, and packed with pillowy crushed ice and garnished with a lot more fresh mint. Sadly, however, doing that for a Derby party of even six people would mean that you'd be at the mixing station almost constantly. Mint Juleps are delicious drinks, and people drink them quickly. Even the host of the party needs some time to handicap the race, call in some bets, and watch the post parade.

The solution is to batch them. Start with minted simple syrup.

    The day before you need the drinks, make a batch of simple syrup by combining one cup each of sugar and water in a sauce pan, and bringing it to a boil over medium heat. Some recipes call for five minutes of boiling, but whenever the syrup is clear and the sugar is dissolved, you are finished. Cut the heat and let it cool.


RECIPE: Mint Juleps by the Batch

I've come to realize that the Kentucky Derby is a pagan holiday: On the first Saturday in May, a lot of people don ritual costumes, sing ritual songs, and drink ritual libations while they attempt to foresee the future by interpreting a coded and vague bit of poetry written into the past performances in the pages of the Daily Racing Form. Like other holidays rooted in the natural anxiety of changing seasons and uncertain futures, it is best enjoyed by groups. Don't sit alone swilling bourbon and wiring more and more money to your bookie, you'll go completely crazy. Spring is in the air. The high holy day of the Derby is a social celebration. It's time to gather friends and set up a betting pool.

Even up North, the mint has grown enough to warrant harvesting. Its gentle leaves are begging to be muddled. I've come to think that mint juleps are best made one at a time, or in small numbers at most, from fresh mint and sugar topped with bourbon, and packed with pillowy crushed ice and garnished with a lot more fresh mint. Sadly, however, doing that for a Derby party of even six people would mean that you'd be at the mixing station almost constantly. Mint Juleps are delicious drinks, and people drink them quickly. Even the host of the party needs some time to handicap the race, call in some bets, and watch the post parade.

The solution is to batch them. Start with minted simple syrup.

    The day before you need the drinks, make a batch of simple syrup by combining one cup each of sugar and water in a sauce pan, and bringing it to a boil over medium heat. Some recipes call for five minutes of boiling, but whenever the syrup is clear and the sugar is dissolved, you are finished. Cut the heat and let it cool.


RECIPE: Mint Juleps by the Batch

I've come to realize that the Kentucky Derby is a pagan holiday: On the first Saturday in May, a lot of people don ritual costumes, sing ritual songs, and drink ritual libations while they attempt to foresee the future by interpreting a coded and vague bit of poetry written into the past performances in the pages of the Daily Racing Form. Like other holidays rooted in the natural anxiety of changing seasons and uncertain futures, it is best enjoyed by groups. Don't sit alone swilling bourbon and wiring more and more money to your bookie, you'll go completely crazy. Spring is in the air. The high holy day of the Derby is a social celebration. It's time to gather friends and set up a betting pool.

Even up North, the mint has grown enough to warrant harvesting. Its gentle leaves are begging to be muddled. I've come to think that mint juleps are best made one at a time, or in small numbers at most, from fresh mint and sugar topped with bourbon, and packed with pillowy crushed ice and garnished with a lot more fresh mint. Sadly, however, doing that for a Derby party of even six people would mean that you'd be at the mixing station almost constantly. Mint Juleps are delicious drinks, and people drink them quickly. Even the host of the party needs some time to handicap the race, call in some bets, and watch the post parade.

The solution is to batch them. Start with minted simple syrup.

    The day before you need the drinks, make a batch of simple syrup by combining one cup each of sugar and water in a sauce pan, and bringing it to a boil over medium heat. Some recipes call for five minutes of boiling, but whenever the syrup is clear and the sugar is dissolved, you are finished. Cut the heat and let it cool.


RECIPE: Mint Juleps by the Batch

I've come to realize that the Kentucky Derby is a pagan holiday: On the first Saturday in May, a lot of people don ritual costumes, sing ritual songs, and drink ritual libations while they attempt to foresee the future by interpreting a coded and vague bit of poetry written into the past performances in the pages of the Daily Racing Form. Like other holidays rooted in the natural anxiety of changing seasons and uncertain futures, it is best enjoyed by groups. Don't sit alone swilling bourbon and wiring more and more money to your bookie, you'll go completely crazy. Spring is in the air. The high holy day of the Derby is a social celebration. It's time to gather friends and set up a betting pool.

Even up North, the mint has grown enough to warrant harvesting. Its gentle leaves are begging to be muddled. I've come to think that mint juleps are best made one at a time, or in small numbers at most, from fresh mint and sugar topped with bourbon, and packed with pillowy crushed ice and garnished with a lot more fresh mint. Sadly, however, doing that for a Derby party of even six people would mean that you'd be at the mixing station almost constantly. Mint Juleps are delicious drinks, and people drink them quickly. Even the host of the party needs some time to handicap the race, call in some bets, and watch the post parade.

The solution is to batch them. Start with minted simple syrup.

    The day before you need the drinks, make a batch of simple syrup by combining one cup each of sugar and water in a sauce pan, and bringing it to a boil over medium heat. Some recipes call for five minutes of boiling, but whenever the syrup is clear and the sugar is dissolved, you are finished. Cut the heat and let it cool.


RECIPE: Mint Juleps by the Batch

I've come to realize that the Kentucky Derby is a pagan holiday: On the first Saturday in May, a lot of people don ritual costumes, sing ritual songs, and drink ritual libations while they attempt to foresee the future by interpreting a coded and vague bit of poetry written into the past performances in the pages of the Daily Racing Form. Like other holidays rooted in the natural anxiety of changing seasons and uncertain futures, it is best enjoyed by groups. Don't sit alone swilling bourbon and wiring more and more money to your bookie, you'll go completely crazy. Spring is in the air. The high holy day of the Derby is a social celebration. It's time to gather friends and set up a betting pool.

Even up North, the mint has grown enough to warrant harvesting. Its gentle leaves are begging to be muddled. I've come to think that mint juleps are best made one at a time, or in small numbers at most, from fresh mint and sugar topped with bourbon, and packed with pillowy crushed ice and garnished with a lot more fresh mint. Sadly, however, doing that for a Derby party of even six people would mean that you'd be at the mixing station almost constantly. Mint Juleps are delicious drinks, and people drink them quickly. Even the host of the party needs some time to handicap the race, call in some bets, and watch the post parade.

The solution is to batch them. Start with minted simple syrup.

    The day before you need the drinks, make a batch of simple syrup by combining one cup each of sugar and water in a sauce pan, and bringing it to a boil over medium heat. Some recipes call for five minutes of boiling, but whenever the syrup is clear and the sugar is dissolved, you are finished. Cut the heat and let it cool.


RECIPE: Mint Juleps by the Batch

I've come to realize that the Kentucky Derby is a pagan holiday: On the first Saturday in May, a lot of people don ritual costumes, sing ritual songs, and drink ritual libations while they attempt to foresee the future by interpreting a coded and vague bit of poetry written into the past performances in the pages of the Daily Racing Form. Like other holidays rooted in the natural anxiety of changing seasons and uncertain futures, it is best enjoyed by groups. Don't sit alone swilling bourbon and wiring more and more money to your bookie, you'll go completely crazy. Spring is in the air. The high holy day of the Derby is a social celebration. It's time to gather friends and set up a betting pool.

Even up North, the mint has grown enough to warrant harvesting. Its gentle leaves are begging to be muddled. I've come to think that mint juleps are best made one at a time, or in small numbers at most, from fresh mint and sugar topped with bourbon, and packed with pillowy crushed ice and garnished with a lot more fresh mint. Sadly, however, doing that for a Derby party of even six people would mean that you'd be at the mixing station almost constantly. Mint Juleps are delicious drinks, and people drink them quickly. Even the host of the party needs some time to handicap the race, call in some bets, and watch the post parade.

The solution is to batch them. Start with minted simple syrup.

    The day before you need the drinks, make a batch of simple syrup by combining one cup each of sugar and water in a sauce pan, and bringing it to a boil over medium heat. Some recipes call for five minutes of boiling, but whenever the syrup is clear and the sugar is dissolved, you are finished. Cut the heat and let it cool.


RECIPE: Mint Juleps by the Batch

I've come to realize that the Kentucky Derby is a pagan holiday: On the first Saturday in May, a lot of people don ritual costumes, sing ritual songs, and drink ritual libations while they attempt to foresee the future by interpreting a coded and vague bit of poetry written into the past performances in the pages of the Daily Racing Form. Like other holidays rooted in the natural anxiety of changing seasons and uncertain futures, it is best enjoyed by groups. Don't sit alone swilling bourbon and wiring more and more money to your bookie, you'll go completely crazy. Spring is in the air. The high holy day of the Derby is a social celebration. It's time to gather friends and set up a betting pool.

Even up North, the mint has grown enough to warrant harvesting. Its gentle leaves are begging to be muddled. I've come to think that mint juleps are best made one at a time, or in small numbers at most, from fresh mint and sugar topped with bourbon, and packed with pillowy crushed ice and garnished with a lot more fresh mint. Sadly, however, doing that for a Derby party of even six people would mean that you'd be at the mixing station almost constantly. Mint Juleps are delicious drinks, and people drink them quickly. Even the host of the party needs some time to handicap the race, call in some bets, and watch the post parade.

The solution is to batch them. Start with minted simple syrup.

    The day before you need the drinks, make a batch of simple syrup by combining one cup each of sugar and water in a sauce pan, and bringing it to a boil over medium heat. Some recipes call for five minutes of boiling, but whenever the syrup is clear and the sugar is dissolved, you are finished. Cut the heat and let it cool.


RECIPE: Mint Juleps by the Batch

I've come to realize that the Kentucky Derby is a pagan holiday: On the first Saturday in May, a lot of people don ritual costumes, sing ritual songs, and drink ritual libations while they attempt to foresee the future by interpreting a coded and vague bit of poetry written into the past performances in the pages of the Daily Racing Form. Like other holidays rooted in the natural anxiety of changing seasons and uncertain futures, it is best enjoyed by groups. Don't sit alone swilling bourbon and wiring more and more money to your bookie, you'll go completely crazy. Spring is in the air. The high holy day of the Derby is a social celebration. It's time to gather friends and set up a betting pool.

Even up North, the mint has grown enough to warrant harvesting. Its gentle leaves are begging to be muddled. I've come to think that mint juleps are best made one at a time, or in small numbers at most, from fresh mint and sugar topped with bourbon, and packed with pillowy crushed ice and garnished with a lot more fresh mint. Sadly, however, doing that for a Derby party of even six people would mean that you'd be at the mixing station almost constantly. Mint Juleps are delicious drinks, and people drink them quickly. Even the host of the party needs some time to handicap the race, call in some bets, and watch the post parade.

The solution is to batch them. Start with minted simple syrup.

    The day before you need the drinks, make a batch of simple syrup by combining one cup each of sugar and water in a sauce pan, and bringing it to a boil over medium heat. Some recipes call for five minutes of boiling, but whenever the syrup is clear and the sugar is dissolved, you are finished. Cut the heat and let it cool.


RECIPE: Mint Juleps by the Batch

I've come to realize that the Kentucky Derby is a pagan holiday: On the first Saturday in May, a lot of people don ritual costumes, sing ritual songs, and drink ritual libations while they attempt to foresee the future by interpreting a coded and vague bit of poetry written into the past performances in the pages of the Daily Racing Form. Like other holidays rooted in the natural anxiety of changing seasons and uncertain futures, it is best enjoyed by groups. Don't sit alone swilling bourbon and wiring more and more money to your bookie, you'll go completely crazy. Spring is in the air. The high holy day of the Derby is a social celebration. It's time to gather friends and set up a betting pool.

Even up North, the mint has grown enough to warrant harvesting. Its gentle leaves are begging to be muddled. I've come to think that mint juleps are best made one at a time, or in small numbers at most, from fresh mint and sugar topped with bourbon, and packed with pillowy crushed ice and garnished with a lot more fresh mint. Sadly, however, doing that for a Derby party of even six people would mean that you'd be at the mixing station almost constantly. Mint Juleps are delicious drinks, and people drink them quickly. Even the host of the party needs some time to handicap the race, call in some bets, and watch the post parade.

The solution is to batch them. Start with minted simple syrup.

    The day before you need the drinks, make a batch of simple syrup by combining one cup each of sugar and water in a sauce pan, and bringing it to a boil over medium heat. Some recipes call for five minutes of boiling, but whenever the syrup is clear and the sugar is dissolved, you are finished. Cut the heat and let it cool.


RECIPE: Mint Juleps by the Batch

I've come to realize that the Kentucky Derby is a pagan holiday: On the first Saturday in May, a lot of people don ritual costumes, sing ritual songs, and drink ritual libations while they attempt to foresee the future by interpreting a coded and vague bit of poetry written into the past performances in the pages of the Daily Racing Form. Like other holidays rooted in the natural anxiety of changing seasons and uncertain futures, it is best enjoyed by groups. Don't sit alone swilling bourbon and wiring more and more money to your bookie, you'll go completely crazy. Spring is in the air. The high holy day of the Derby is a social celebration. It's time to gather friends and set up a betting pool.

Even up North, the mint has grown enough to warrant harvesting. Its gentle leaves are begging to be muddled. I've come to think that mint juleps are best made one at a time, or in small numbers at most, from fresh mint and sugar topped with bourbon, and packed with pillowy crushed ice and garnished with a lot more fresh mint. Sadly, however, doing that for a Derby party of even six people would mean that you'd be at the mixing station almost constantly. Mint Juleps are delicious drinks, and people drink them quickly. Even the host of the party needs some time to handicap the race, call in some bets, and watch the post parade.

The solution is to batch them. Start with minted simple syrup.

    The day before you need the drinks, make a batch of simple syrup by combining one cup each of sugar and water in a sauce pan, and bringing it to a boil over medium heat. Some recipes call for five minutes of boiling, but whenever the syrup is clear and the sugar is dissolved, you are finished. Cut the heat and let it cool.